Why Does Calculating Runner A's Distance Give Different Results?

  • Thread starter deaninator
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    Kinematic
In summary, the distance traveled by Runner A can be calculated using the equation X=1/2(Vo + V)T, where X represents displacement, Vo represents initial velocity, V represents velocity, and T represents time. With a velocity of 6.0 m/s and a time of 10 seconds, the calculation would result in a distance of 60 meters.
  • #1
deaninator
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Homework Statement


Runner A runs at 6.0 m/s for 10 s. How far does he go?
NOTE: THE ANSWER IS 60 m BUT I DON'T KNOW HOW IT GOT TO THAT.

Homework Equations


V=Vo + at
X=1/2(Vo +V)T
X=VoT + 1/2at2
V2=Vo2 + 2ax

(If a 2 is after a letter then it means squared)
X=displacement
A=Acceleration
T=Tome
Vo=Initial Velocity
V=Velocity


The Attempt at a Solution



X=1/2(Vo +V)T
x=1/2(6 m/s)(10 sec)
 
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  • #2
You have a velocity (m/s) and a time (s). Even just looking at the units, how would you get a distance (m) ?
 
  • #3
fss said:
You have a velocity (m/s) and a time (s). Even just looking at the units, how would you get a distance (m) ?

You get the distance using the distance formula that I have listed above under previous tries...
 
  • #4
lol poor attempt at trolling tbh.
 
  • #5
[Plug in the given values]
x=1/2(60 m)
x=30 m [Simplify]

The key to solving this kinematic problem is to use the correct equation that relates the variables given in the problem. In this case, we are given the initial velocity (Vo), time (T), and want to find the displacement (X). The equation that relates these variables is X=1/2(Vo +V)T.

To solve, simply plug in the given values and simplify the equation. In this case, the initial velocity (Vo) is 6.0 m/s and the time (T) is 10 seconds. Plugging these values into the equation, we get X=1/2(6 m/s)(10 sec), which simplifies to X=30 m. This means that Runner A traveled a distance of 30 meters in 10 seconds at a velocity of 6.0 m/s.

It is important to note that there are other equations that can also be used to solve this problem, such as X=VoT + 1/2at^2 or V^2=Vo^2 + 2aX. These equations may be more suitable depending on the given variables and the information that is being asked for. It is always important to carefully read the problem and determine which equation to use before plugging in values.
 

Related to Why Does Calculating Runner A's Distance Give Different Results?

1. How do I determine the initial velocity in a kinematic problem?

To determine the initial velocity, you will need to know the final velocity, acceleration, and displacement of the object. Use the kinematic equation v = u + at, where v is the final velocity, u is the initial velocity, a is acceleration, and t is time. Rearrange the equation to solve for u.

2. What is the difference between average and instantaneous velocity?

Average velocity is the total displacement divided by the total time taken. Instantaneous velocity is the velocity at a specific moment in time. In kinematic problems, average velocity is often used when the object has a constant velocity, while instantaneous velocity is used when the object has a changing velocity.

3. How do I determine the displacement in a kinematic problem?

To determine the displacement, you will need to know the initial and final velocities, acceleration, and time. Use the kinematic equation s = ut + 1/2at^2, where s is displacement, u is initial velocity, a is acceleration, and t is time. Rearrange the equation to solve for s.

4. Can I use kinematic equations for objects moving in a circular path?

No, kinematic equations are only applicable for objects moving in a straight line. For objects moving in a circular path, you will need to use circular motion equations.

5. How do I solve a kinematic problem with multiple objects?

In a kinematic problem with multiple objects, you will need to consider each object separately and use the same equations as you would for a single object. Keep in mind the initial and final positions, velocities, and accelerations of each object and use the equations to solve for the unknown variables.

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