Why Does Temperature Remain Constant When Water Boils?

In summary, the graph of time v. temperature would show a straight line with a constant slope from the original water temperature to 100 degrees in the first 6 minutes, followed by a straight horizontal line between 6 minutes and 10 minutes. During the last 4 minutes, the temperature would remain constant because the heat energy was being used to change the water to steam rather than increase the temperature.
  • #1
physgirl
99
0
So if heat energy is transferred at a constant rate until the water reaches its boiling point temperature (in 6 min let's say)... and then heat energy is transferrred at the same rate as the water boils for the next 4 min...

would the graph of time v. temperature look like: a straight line with constant slope going from original water temperature to 100 degrees in the first 6 minutes and then a straight horizontal line b/w 6 min and 10 min?

also, if that is correct, for the last 4 minutes, is the temperature constant despite the heat energy transfer because... the energy was being spent on changing water to steam rather than increasing the temperature?
 
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  • #2
Yes and yes.
 
  • #3


I can confirm that the graph of time versus temperature would indeed look like a straight line with a constant slope for the first 6 minutes, reaching the boiling point temperature of 100 degrees. This is because during this time, heat energy is being transferred at a constant rate and the temperature is increasing steadily.

For the next 4 minutes, the graph would show a horizontal line at the boiling point temperature of 100 degrees. This is because during this time, the heat energy is being used to convert the water from liquid to gas, rather than increasing the temperature. This process is known as latent heat of vaporization.

So, you are correct in your understanding that the temperature remains constant during the last 4 minutes due to the heat energy being spent on changing the water to steam. It is important to note that this process is only possible at the boiling point temperature, as any additional heat energy would cause the temperature to increase instead of converting the water to steam.

In summary, the graph of time versus temperature would show a straight line with a constant slope for the first 6 minutes, followed by a horizontal line at the boiling point temperature for the next 4 minutes, and then a sudden increase in temperature once all the water has been converted to steam. This is a clear illustration of the relationship between heat energy and water and how it affects the temperature of the substance.
 

Related to Why Does Temperature Remain Constant When Water Boils?

1. What is the relationship between heat energy and water?

Heat energy and water have a direct relationship, as heat is a form of energy that can be transferred to water to change its temperature. When heat is added to water, its molecules gain energy and move faster, causing an increase in temperature. Similarly, when heat is removed from water, its temperature decreases.

2. How does heat energy affect the physical state of water?

Heat energy plays a crucial role in changing the physical state of water. When heat is added to ice, it melts and becomes liquid water. As more heat energy is added, liquid water turns into water vapor or steam. On the other hand, when heat is removed from water vapor, it condenses and turns back into liquid water. This process is known as the water cycle.

3. Why does water take longer to heat up compared to other substances?

Water has a high specific heat capacity, which means it requires a large amount of heat energy to raise its temperature. This is due to the strong hydrogen bonds between water molecules, which require more energy to break. As a result, it takes longer for water to heat up compared to other substances with lower specific heat capacities.

4. How does heat energy affect the density of water?

As water molecules gain heat energy and move faster, they spread apart, causing water to expand and become less dense. This is why ice floats on top of liquid water – because it is less dense than liquid water. On the other hand, when water cools down, its molecules slow down and come closer together, making water more dense.

5. What is the role of heat energy in the water cycle?

Heat energy is a crucial component of the water cycle. The sun's heat energy causes water to evaporate from bodies of water and land, turning it into water vapor. As the water vapor rises, it cools and condenses into clouds. When the clouds become too heavy, the water falls back to the earth's surface as precipitation, which can be in the form of rain, snow, or hail. This process continues in a cycle, with heat energy driving the movement of water throughout the earth's atmosphere.

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