Why is HCl called Hydrogen Chloride (by IUPAC naming)?

In summary, the conversation discusses the IUPAC naming for hydrogen chloride and its different names depending on its state. It is clarified that the IUPAC name for hydrogen chloride is indeed hydrogen chloride and not hydrogen monochloride, despite having a polar covalent bond. The conversation also mentions the difference between the names for the gas and the solution in water.
  • #1
pkc111
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Homework Statement
Why is HCl called Hydrogen Chloride (by IUPAC naming) and not Hydrogen Monochloride? It has a polar covalent bond (not ionic).
Relevant Equations
Covalent bonds have a prefix on the last name according to IUPAC.
The difference in electronegativity between H and Cl is about 0.96, well and truly below the 1.7 generally regarded as the ionic/covalent border.
Hydrogen Monochloride
 
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  • #2
I would check one of the color books (never remember which one is which) to see if:
1. hydrogen chloride is really a correct IUPAC name
2. it is not one of the exclusions
 
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  • #3
Red book says the IUPAC name is hydrogen chloride. I am not sure why though.
 
  • #4
I feel like Red Book IR-5.2 explains it.
 
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  • #5
Is this the bit that explains it..? (from IR 5.2)

1606345154636.png
 
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  • #6
That's my understanding.
 
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  • #7
Ok thanks Borek, very helpful!
 
Last edited:
  • #8
Gee! All this time I thought it was called hydrochloric acid.
says it is just the gas that is called hydrochloride. So I also learned a second new-to-me chemistry concept:
a compound can have a different name depending on its state: gas or liquid.
 
  • #9
Liquid hydrogen chloride is still hydrogen chloride. Hydrochloric acid is a solution of HCl in water.
 
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  • #10
pkc111 said:
Homework Statement:: Why is HCl called Hydrogen Chloride (by IUPAC naming) and not Hydrogen Monochloride? It has a polar covalent bond (not ionic).
Relevant Equations:: Covalent bonds have a prefix on the last name according to IUPAC.
The difference in electronegativity between H and Cl is about 0.96, well and truly below the 1.7 generally regarded as the ionic/covalent border.

Hydrogen Monochloride
The naming and abbreviating work the other way around. The compound is Hydrogen Chloride (for the gas) and Hydrochloric Acid (for the solution in water). The written symbolization for Hydrogen is H. The written symbolization for Chlorine is Cl.
 

Related to Why is HCl called Hydrogen Chloride (by IUPAC naming)?

1. Why is HCl called Hydrogen Chloride?

HCl is called Hydrogen Chloride because it is a compound composed of one hydrogen atom and one chlorine atom. The naming convention used by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) states that the first element in a compound is named first, followed by the second element with the suffix "-ide". Therefore, the name Hydrogen Chloride accurately describes the composition of this compound.

2. What is the IUPAC naming system?

The IUPAC naming system is an internationally recognized system used to name chemical compounds. It is based on rules and guidelines set by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This system ensures that every compound has a unique and systematic name, making it easier for scientists to communicate and identify different compounds.

3. How does the IUPAC naming system work?

The IUPAC naming system follows a set of rules to determine the name of a compound. These rules include identifying the elements present in the compound, determining the oxidation states of each element, and following a specific order for naming the elements. The system also takes into account the structure and functional groups present in the compound.

4. Is HCl the only name for Hydrogen Chloride?

No, HCl is not the only name for Hydrogen Chloride. In addition to the IUPAC naming system, there are also common names for chemical compounds. In this case, Hydrogen Chloride is also commonly known as Muriatic Acid. However, the IUPAC naming system is the standard for scientific communication and is used to avoid confusion and ensure consistency.

5. Are there exceptions to the IUPAC naming system?

Yes, there are some exceptions to the IUPAC naming system. For example, some compounds have common names that are widely used and recognized, such as water (H2O) and ammonia (NH3). In these cases, the common names are still used in scientific communication. Additionally, there are some compounds that do not follow the traditional naming rules, such as organic compounds with complex structures. In these cases, the IUPAC system provides guidelines for naming these compounds.

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