Why is it important to check the magnitude of vectors when adding them?

  • Thread starter ryanking93
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    Newtons
In summary: When adding vectors, it is good to check that the result is not greater than the addition of the magnitude of each independent vector.
  • #1
ryanking93
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Homework Statement
Add the following vectors and determine the resultants (length, angle from O)
Relevant Equations
3 m/s. 45° + 5 m/s. 135°
So I've charted the equation above, and received the correct resultant 104.0° I used a scale of 1m/s = 2cm and I get 11.8cm which gives me 23.6m/s but when I look at the answer it is 104.0° / 5.83N

I have no idea why its in Newtons.
 
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  • #2
Welcome! :smile:
Could you post the original text of the problem?
The value you found is not correct.
 
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  • #3
Lnewqban said:
Welcome! :smile:
Could you post the original text of the problem?

Thank you. I have attached both the questions and answers I am referencing. The specific question is "C"

And my answer to the question.
 

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  • #4
Typographical error.
 
  • #5
OmCheeto said:
Typographical error.

Okay, Thank you. I thought I might be losing it for a minute.
 
  • #6
ryanking93 said:
Thank you. I have attached both the questions and answers I am referencing. The specific question is "C"

And my answer to the question.
It is an error of the booklet, the resultant vector should be in m/s.
Note that the angle between your vectors is 90°, therefore, you could apply the Pythagorean equation and see that the result can't be 23.6 m/s.
 
  • #7
Lnewqban said:
It is an error of the booklet, the resultant vector should be in m/s.
Note that the angle between your vectors is 90°, therefore, you could apply the Pythagorean equation and see that the result can't be 23.6 m/s.

Ahhhh I see now! My issue was when I ended up with 11.8cm instead of dividing by 2 I multiplied by 2. As my scale was 1m/s = 2cm. I end up with 5.9m/s.

Thanks a million for the help!
 
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  • #8
ryanking93 said:
Ahhhh I see now! My issue was when I ended up with 11.8cm instead of dividing by 2 I multiplied by 2. As my scale was 1m/s = 2cm. I end up with 5.9m/s.

Thanks a million for the help!
When adding vectors, it is good to check that the result is not greater than the addition of the magnitude of each independent vector.
You are welcome. :smile:
 
  • Informative
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1. How do I convert meters per second (m/s) to Newtons (N)?

To convert m/s to N, you need to use the formula F = m x a, where F is the force in Newtons, m is the mass in kilograms, and a is the acceleration in meters per second squared. So, if you have the mass and acceleration, simply multiply them together to get the force in Newtons.

2. Can I use the same formula to convert other units of speed to Newtons?

No, the formula F = m x a is specifically for converting m/s to N. If you have a different unit of speed, such as miles per hour (mph) or kilometers per hour (km/h), you will need to first convert it to m/s before using the formula.

3. Is there a specific unit for force besides Newtons?

Yes, there are several other units for force, such as pounds (lb) and dynes (dyn). However, the Newton is the standard unit for force in the International System of Units (SI).

4. Can I use an online calculator to convert m/s to N?

Yes, there are many online calculators that can help you convert m/s to N. Just make sure to double check the formula and units being used to ensure accuracy.

5. Why is it important to know how to convert m/s to N?

Knowing how to convert units is important in science and engineering because it allows us to make accurate calculations and comparisons. In the case of m/s to N, it helps us understand the relationship between speed, mass, and force in a given situation.

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