Why is there force on a current carrying conductor?

  • Thread starter quawa99
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  • #1
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I know that charges experience a force when they are moving with respect to a magnetic feild , but in case of conductor how is the force on the freely flowing electrons transferred to the structure of the conductor?
 

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The electrons aren't freely flowing. They're bound to the metal lattice. And as they drift, they interact sufficiently quickly with the lattice to transfer their momentum to it.
 
  • #3
jtbell
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Electrons do tend to move towards one side of the conductor. This produces a transverse potential difference which impedes further such motion. This potential difference can be measured, and is known as the Hall effect:

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/magnetic/hall.html
 
  • #4
Doc Al
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I know that charges experience a force when they are moving with respect to a magnetic feild , but in case of conductor how is the force on the freely flowing electrons transferred to the structure of the conductor?
As the electrons get pushed to the side, a positive charge (from the lattice) is left behind. The electrostatic field created allows the magnetic force to be "transferred" to the lattice.

(jtbell beat me to it!)
 

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