Work Done by Water on Skier: Solving a Physics Problem

In summary, a water skier is moving at 14m/s with a rope at a 35 degree angle from the centre line of the boat. The tension in the rope is 90.0N and the skier travels 50 meters. The resistive force of the water does work on the skier, which can be calculated using the equation W=FD where F is the component of the force in the direction of the displacement. The component of the tension in the direction of motion balances the resistive force.
  • #1
soul5
64
0

Homework Statement


A water skier is moving at 14m/s. The rope makes a 35 degree angle with the centre line of the boat. If the tension in the rope is 90.0N, how much work does the resistive force of the water do on the skier while traveling 50 meters.


Homework Equations


W=FD



The Attempt at a Solution


I tried finding F in the x?
 
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  • #2
I don't think you tried hard enough. Can you show us what you did? Since the skier is not accelerating the resistive force balances the x component of the tension force.
 
  • #3
There is no acceleration so draw the force diagram. x-part of the tension is equal to the resistance.
 
  • #4
silvashadow said:
There is no acceleration so draw the force diagram. x-part of the tension is equal to the resistance.

In what way does that differ from what I said? Or are you just reinforcing the point?
 
  • #5
Dick said:
I don't think you tried hard enough. Can you show us what you did? Since the skier is not accelerating the resistive force balances the x component of the tension force.

lol what does that mean?
 
  • #6
You quoted equations, I thought you knew how to use them. W=F*D where F is the component of the force in the direction of the displacement. Compute the component of the tension in the direction of motion, lol.
 
  • #7
Dick said:
In what way does that differ from what I said? Or are you just reinforcing the point?

Sorry Dick, I guess second opinions are not welcome here.
 
  • #8
Sorry, silvashadow. I always regret writing negative stuff like that. I know you were just trying to help.
 

Related to Work Done by Water on Skier: Solving a Physics Problem

1. What is the concept of work done by water on a skier?

The concept of work done by water on a skier is a physics principle that explains the amount of energy transferred from the water to the skier as the skier moves through the water. This work is usually measured in joules and is a result of the force exerted by the water on the skier.

2. How is the work done by water on a skier calculated?

The work done by water on a skier is calculated by multiplying the force of the water on the skier by the distance the skier travels through the water. This can be represented by the equation W = Fd, where W is work, F is force, and d is distance.

3. What factors affect the work done by water on a skier?

The work done by water on a skier can be affected by several factors, including the speed of the skier, the density of the water, the surface area of the skier, and the angle of the skier's movement through the water. These factors can impact the force exerted by the water and the distance the skier travels, which ultimately affect the amount of work done.

4. How does the work done by water on a skier impact the skier's motion?

The work done by water on a skier has a direct impact on the skier's motion. As the skier moves through the water, the work done by the water transfers energy to the skier, causing them to accelerate and continue moving forward. This work also helps to counteract any external forces, such as friction, that may slow down the skier's motion.

5. How can the work done by water on a skier be used in real-life scenarios?

The concept of work done by water on a skier can be applied in various real-life scenarios, such as understanding the dynamics of water sports like skiing, wakeboarding, and surfing. It can also be useful in designing and improving watercraft, such as boats and ships, by optimizing their movement through the water and reducing the work done by the water on the vessel.

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