Work/force/kinematics slingshot problem

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In summary, the rock is shot downward from a bridge 18 meters above a stream using a slingshot stretched by 43 centimeters with an average force of 8.2 Newtons. The spring/work equation applies and the potential energy of the sling shot is converted to kinetic energy to determine the velocity of the rock. The final velocity is not zero and the time can be found using kinematics equations.
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Shadowsol
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1. An average force of 8.2 Newtons is used to pull a .4 kg rock, stretching a sling shot 43 centimeters. The rock is shot downward from a bridge 18 meters above a stream. What will be the velocity of the rock just before it hits the water? How much time will it take to hit the water.



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3. I just want to know if the spring/work equation, .5k(x)squared=w applies to the slingshot, and would stretching it by 43 CM = the x part of the equation? I don't know what to do once I get work. How do i get the velocity of the rock? I know A after shot would be 9.8, d is 18, but is final Velocity 0?
 
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  • #2
Shadowsol said:
3. I just want to know if the spring/work equation, .5k(x)squared=w applies to the slingshot, and would stretching it by 43 CM = the x part of the equation? I don't know what to do once I get work. How do i get the velocity of the rock? I know A after shot would be 9.8, d is 18, but is final Velocity 0?


It does apply, and yes. The spring PE is converted to KE. That's how you get the velocity. Final velocity nowhere is zero.
 
  • #3
Ok, so I put in the force*the distance it was pulled back to get the potential sling shot energy. I than set that equal to the KE equation and got V. Than I simply used that V as V0, used 9.8 as A, and 18 m as D, than solved for V1. Is this correct?
 
  • #4
Absolutely. You find the time using the same kinematics.
 

Related to Work/force/kinematics slingshot problem

1. What is a slingshot problem in kinematics?

A slingshot problem in kinematics refers to a situation where an object is launched from a slingshot with an initial velocity and angle of launch, and the goal is to determine its final position, velocity, or other parameters at a specific time.

2. How do you solve a slingshot problem in kinematics?

To solve a slingshot problem in kinematics, you can use the equations of motion and the kinematic formulas to calculate the final position, velocity, and acceleration of the object. It is important to consider the initial conditions, such as the initial velocity and angle of launch, and the forces acting on the object, such as gravity and air resistance.

3. What are the key principles involved in solving a slingshot problem in kinematics?

The key principles involved in solving a slingshot problem in kinematics are understanding the motion of the object, identifying the initial conditions, applying the equations of motion, and considering the forces acting on the object. It is also important to use the correct units and to check your calculations for accuracy.

4. How does the angle of launch affect the trajectory of an object in a slingshot problem?

The angle of launch determines the initial direction of the object's motion, which affects its trajectory. A lower angle of launch will result in a shorter horizontal distance traveled, while a higher angle of launch will result in a longer horizontal distance. The optimal angle of launch for maximum horizontal distance is 45 degrees in the absence of air resistance.

5. What are some real-life applications of slingshot problems in kinematics?

Slingshot problems in kinematics have many real-life applications, such as in sports like golf, baseball, and basketball where the trajectory of a ball is crucial for scoring points. They are also used in engineering and physics to calculate the motion of projectiles, such as rockets and missiles. Additionally, slingshot problems can be used in computer simulations and video games to accurately model the motion of objects.

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