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Lactose intolerance

by nucleargirl
Tags: intolerance, lactose
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Proton Soup
#55
Feb10-11, 10:27 AM
P: 1,070
Quote Quote by bobze View Post

If you had a reaction to milk proteins (namely casein) you'd be having an allergic reaction to milk, not an intolerance to lactose (which is possible, though much more rare).
my microbiology professor just yesterday stated in lecture that most lactose "intolerance" was actually an allergic reaction, but didn't elaborate. if so, that would make sense that casein causes problems for some, but i'm not quite sure what to make of it.
ebits21
#56
Feb10-11, 11:06 AM
P: 51
Quote Quote by mugaliens View Post
Here's an interesting graphic showing lactose intolerance by geographic and ethnic groups. It ranges between 0.3% for Basques and 100% for Native Americans. I find that last one interesting, as the five runners-up are all Asiatic.
It's perfectly logical, Native Americans are a migration of Asians and therefore share many traits with them.
bobze
#57
Feb10-11, 07:47 PM
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PF Gold
P: 645
Quote Quote by Proton Soup View Post
my microbiology professor just yesterday stated in lecture that most lactose "intolerance" was actually an allergic reaction, but didn't elaborate. if so, that would make sense that casein causes problems for some, but i'm not quite sure what to make of it.
Hmm, I don't know. I'm skeptical of that claim, which would imply allergic reaction being more prevalent than lack of an enzyme (which is in low capacity anyway). I've always learned its the other way around, but I'm not saying that is necessarily right. I've never looked into it before.

Anecdotally there is some things that lead me to believe your professor is wrong. Namely, that if the allergic reaction was predominant than this manifestation would be more common while the patients were children. Since lactose intolerance is generally a problem of aging, and as we age we have less lactase in the digestive epithelium, it would be counter-intuitive to think most cases of lactose intolerance (we see most in adults) are from allergies.

More anecdotal; can't say that I have ever known anyone with an allergy to milk (this would be a huge deal and drastically alter their life from the time they were a baby). Nor have I yet to a scratch test come up positive for a milk allergy, but I haven't seen that many scratch tests yet.

Anyway, could you ask your Prof for more information or look into it? I don't have time right now, block exams in T-minus 96 hours!
nismaratwork
#58
Feb10-11, 08:51 PM
P: 2,284
Quote Quote by bobze View Post
Hmm, I don't know. I'm skeptical of that claim, which would imply allergic reaction being more prevalent than lack of an enzyme (which is in low capacity anyway). I've always learned its the other way around, but I'm not saying that is necessarily right. I've never looked into it before.

Anecdotally there is some things that lead me to believe your professor is wrong. Namely, that if the allergic reaction was predominant than this manifestation would be more common while the patients were children. Since lactose intolerance is generally a problem of aging, and as we age we have less lactase in the digestive epithelium, it would be counter-intuitive to think most cases of lactose intolerance (we see most in adults) are from allergies.

More anecdotal; can't say that I have ever known anyone with an allergy to milk (this would be a huge deal and drastically alter their life from the time they were a baby). Nor have I yet to a scratch test come up positive for a milk allergy, but I haven't seen that many scratch tests yet.

Anyway, could you ask your Prof for more information or look into it? I don't have time right now, block exams in T-minus 96 hours!
Yeah, you're probably going to want to read this then! Oh children, they really are more than just little adults... they're a genuine pain in the posterior!

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/milk-allergy/DS01008

Quote Quote by Mayo Staff
Definition
By Mayo Clinic staff

Milk allergy is one of the most common food allergies in children. Although cow's milk is the usual cause of milk allergy, milk from sheep, goats and buffalo also can cause a reaction. And, some children who are allergic to cow's milk are allergic to soy milk too.

A milk allergy usually occurs a few minutes to a few hours after you consume milk. Signs and symptoms of milk allergy range from mild to severe and can include wheezing, vomiting, hives and digestive problems. Rarely, milk allergy can cause anaphylaxis a severe, life-threatening reaction.

Avoidance is the primary treatment for milk allergy. Fortunately, most children outgrow a milk allergy by age 3.
MOST common?! I really would have guessed peanuts or nightshade relatives, and I'd have been wrong.

This is quite good, for one line I think you'll find supports the notion that lactose intolerance is distinct from milk allergy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milk_allergy

Quote Quote by Wikipedia
Difference between milk allergy and lactose intolerance Milk allergy is a food allergy, an adverse immune reaction to a food protein that is normally harmless to the non-allergic individual. Lactose intolerance is a non-allergic food sensitivity, and comes from a lack of production of the enzyme lactase, required to digest the predominant sugar in milk. Adverse effects of lactose intolerance generally occur after much higher levels of milk consumption than do adverse effects of milk allergy.

Bolding mine: I don't know about you, but I face-palmed there... of COURSE... you even mentioned scratch tests! Immune vs. Enzyme presents differently, and of course there's no risk of anaphylaxis from the latter.
nucleargirl
#59
May4-11, 02:39 PM
P: 126
Hello all!
So, I was trying to eat milk everyday since like 6 months ago. I didnt stick to it very strictly cos I would forget or would have to work or something. Anyway, so in the past month or so... I have noticed no problems with milk anymore! I dont know if this is related to my diet, or to the radioactive iodine therapy I had in mid-March. But, awesome!!! no more bloating or otherwise!! milk galore!!! ahhhh so, there is the possibility of your body changing! but I dont know the cause of my change so... this revelation might not be very helpful for anyone else...
also my skin has cleared up in the last week! I have no idea why!

So to elaborate: I think I was still intolerant in January cos I remember buying lactose free milk on holiday. But during Easter I was staying with someone and we had a cup of normal milk for breakfast every day, and I had no problems. so thats when I noticed I wasn't intolerant anymore. not sure exactly when it happened cos I wasnt really looking out for changes the whole time.
Ouabache
#60
May12-11, 07:24 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 1,326
Quote Quote by nucleargirl View Post
hahaha... Dont worry, I have opened all the windows so I dont suffocate from the... explosions.
If you didn't you would be hoisted by your own petard
I know I am replying to a dated post.

Quote Quote by nucleargirl
So, I was trying to eat milk everyday since like 6 months ago. I didnt stick to it very strictly cos I would forget or would have to work or something. Anyway, so in the past month or so... I have noticed no problems with milk anymore!
It seems to me, my h.s. biology instructor explained when we induce lactose intolerance by stopping consumption of dairy for a period, we could re-induce tolerance by reintroduction of dairy incrementally back to our diet. Your experience confirms her explanation.

Quote Quote by ebits21

It's perfectly logical, Native Americans are a migration of Asians and therefore share many traits with them.
My instructor of anthropology also pointed this out (that Native Americans populating both N and SA continents have the same common ancestry as the mongols of northern China). And based on his discussion of current knowledge, it seemed quite logical this occurred.

Just be sure you are tactful when explaining to a Native American that they didn't originate on the American continent. Several that I have mentioned this to, were not very receptive.


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