CERN team claims measurement of neutrino speed >c


by turbo
Tags: anisotropy, cern, ftl, gps, new math books
kikokoko
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#685
Feb22-12, 04:15 PM
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one word to describe this story:
embarrassing
Drakkith
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#686
Feb22-12, 04:22 PM
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Quote Quote by kikokoko View Post
one word to describe this story:
embarrassing
These things happen. Especially with horrendously complex machines like the LHC and other particle accelerators that they use. I personally was expecting something like this to be the culprit. Though that isn't saying much I suppose.
MartinJH
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#687
Feb22-12, 04:23 PM
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Quote Quote by kikokoko View Post
one word to describe this story:
embarrassing
But inevitable?
CaptFirePanda
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#688
Feb22-12, 04:25 PM
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They needed to get the news out there in the event that they were right. CERN was very cautious in making any claims to the validity and expressed that confirmation was key in order for them to come to any absolute conclusions. There is nothing embarassing about this as it is how Science functions.
Drakkith
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#689
Feb22-12, 04:28 PM
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Quote Quote by MartinJH View Post
But inevitable?
Mistakes in general are inevitable. But there's no way to tell where they will crop up.
Luckily CERN was adamante in saying they needed confirmation.
kikokoko
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#690
Feb22-12, 04:37 PM
P: 7
the embarrassment is not about the science discovery path
(often involving trial-error procedures)

The HUGE problem was the hurry on the claim:
why do these guys announced amazing results,
before to accurately check instruments (timing, GPS, cabling, and so on)?
CaptFirePanda
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#691
Feb22-12, 04:43 PM
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The announcement, as with many claims of fairly substantial implications, is made as a placeholder of sorts so that, if they are right, no one else has the chance to scoop the claim.

It may be a little hasty, but the announcement is made with a boat load of caveats to set expectations properly.
MartinJH
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#692
Feb22-12, 04:46 PM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
Mistakes in general are inevitable. But there's no way to tell where they will crop up.
Luckily CERN was adamante in saying they needed confirmation.
I didn't mean to sound as harsh as that and I agree with you also.
nsaspook
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#693
Feb22-12, 05:13 PM
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The friend of all technicians says, gotcha again. http://jcdverha.home.xs4all.nl/scijokes/9_6.html
jambaugh
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#694
Feb22-12, 05:32 PM
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Quote Quote by Histspec View Post
It seems that a simple explanation of this result has been found no superluminal neutrinos, but only a bad connection between GPS and a Computer.
Dang it! I didn't get a chance to get some bets in. I'd have given long odds the report was due to a glitch in the apparatus.

I am surprised the original claim got reported in the first place.
Integral
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#695
Feb22-12, 06:52 PM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
Wooo! Looks like they found the problem! No more Einstein is wrong posts!
Somehow I doubt that "Einstein is wrong" will ever go away. To many out there with nothing other then their gut to guide them and the natural gut reaction is that it cannot be right.
sshai45
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#696
Feb22-12, 08:28 PM
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Quote Quote by nsaspook View Post
The friend of all technicians says, gotcha again. http://jcdverha.home.xs4all.nl/scijokes/9_6.html
Oh well. Bummer, but that's science for 'ya. Gotta accept it.
sshai45
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#697
Feb22-12, 08:30 PM
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Quote Quote by Integral View Post
Somehow I doubt that "Einstein is wrong" will ever go away. To many out there with nothing other then their gut to guide them and the natural gut reaction is that it cannot be right.
But the difference is that in this case they looked like they really had something that might have posed a challenge, not just a "gut feeling". It turned out not to, but still...
AlchemistK
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#698
Feb22-12, 08:51 PM
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http://arstechnica.com/science/news/...oose-cable.ars

So is it a loose cable or a bad connection?
sshai45
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#699
Feb22-12, 08:57 PM
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Quote Quote by AlchemistK View Post
http://arstechnica.com/science/news/...oose-cable.ars

So is it a loose cable or a bad connection?
If the cable is loose, it doesn't make a good connection.
AlchemistK
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#700
Feb22-12, 09:14 PM
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In the earlier news it was about a bad connection between the GPS and the computers, now its about a loose fiber optic cable connecting with atomic clocks.
sshai45
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#701
Feb22-12, 09:16 PM
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Quote Quote by AlchemistK View Post
In the earlier news it was about a bad connection between the GPS and the computers, now its about a loose fiber optic cable connecting with atomic clocks.
You sure? This here:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...81L2B820120222

says "a loose fiber optic cable linking a Global Positioning System satellite receiver to a computer."
Passionflower
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#702
Feb22-12, 10:11 PM
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If this loose cable thing is confirmed I think it is very worrying, not for the particular experiment where the Neutrino speed was anomalous but for all other experiments.

All other experiments before and after would have potentially given false data and nothing would have been suspected, only now when we found 'impossible' results do we check.

Seems they need to hire a guy who checks the cables before every experiment.


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