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Robots can get driver's license in Nevada

by Pythagorean
Tags: driver, license, nevada, robots
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MarcoD
#37
Mar3-12, 08:16 PM
P: 98
Say you're next to a baseball field for kids. A human driver could, possibly, slow down because he or she knows the situation. A baseball wouldn't track on the sensors, neither would a party moving behind other cars.

It's a trade-off. But I wouldn't let a robotic car drive very fast in suburbs.
CaptFirePanda
#38
Mar3-12, 08:17 PM
P: 27
Quote Quote by Office_Shredder View Post
That's a situation where the robot driver could be superior to a human
[emphasis mine]

I most definitely agree, but mistakes will happen. Whether it's a manufacturing defect or an installation defect, there is always room for error.

What bothers me most about this is the fact that if I cut off a robot driver and it honks at me, will it be hurt when I flip it the bird in my rearview mirror?

Quote Quote by MarcoD View Post
Say you're next to a baseball field for kids. A human driver could, possibly, slow down because he or she knows the situation. A baseball wouldn't track on the sensors, neither would a party moving behind other cars.
The data would likely allow for the robot driver to "know" it was driving past a baseball field and it could slow down accordingly. It would also be limited by posted speed limits and wouldn;t have the urge to drive just a little faster than legally allowed.
AlephZero
#39
Mar3-12, 09:45 PM
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Quote Quote by MarcoD View Post
It's a trade-off. But I wouldn't let a robotic car drive very fast in suburbs.
I expect it would be programmed to obey speed limits at all times - unlike most human drivers.
SW VandeCarr
#40
Mar4-12, 02:46 AM
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Quote Quote by AlephZero View Post
Considering that most of Nevada has a population density of less than 10 people per square mile (according to wikipedia), close encounters with kids playing with balls is probably not much of an issue.

In that environment, I expect a human could pass the driving test without ever meeting most hazard situations for real.
That's just an average. Ever been to Las Vegas, Reno? They're cities, just like cities everywhere. The cities are where the cars and darting kids are. Most visitors to Las Vegas arrive by air. When you're in the city, you're not even aware that the city is surrounded by endless miles of desert*. It's not relevant.

* Except when the wind blows sand into the city.
Office_Shredder
#41
Mar4-12, 04:28 AM
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Quote Quote by CaptFirePanda View Post
What bothers me most about this is the fact that if I cut off a robot driver and it honks at me, will it be hurt when I flip it the bird in my rearview mirror?
It doesn't come standard but should be an option in most mid-line sedans by 2020
mheslep
#42
Mar5-12, 01:55 PM
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Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
I can't remember exactly who said this (a top guy in GM perhaps?) but I read recently that in the last decade there has been a substantial development in the technology behind self-driving cars.
...
Indeed:

Quote Quote by 2005
DARPA Grand Challenge—a raucous race for robotic, driverless vehicles sponsored by the Pentagon, which awards a $2 million purse to the winning team. Armed with artificial intelligence, laser-guided vision, GPS navigation, and 3-D mapping systems, the contenders are some of the world's most advanced robots. Yet even their formidable technology and mechanical prowess may not be enough to overcome the grueling 130-mile course through Nevada's desert terrain. From concept to construction to the final competition, "The Great Robot Race" delivers the absorbing inside story of clever engineers and their unyielding drive to create a champion, capturing the only aerial footage that exists of the Grand Challenge.
The engineering on the winning Stanford vehicle in particular was IMO exquisite.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/darpa/about.html
ThomasT
#43
Mar5-12, 02:23 PM
P: 1,414
@ dipole,
Actually, I was just joking. Maybe I watch too much scifi.

I think it's a great idea to develop the technology, however I'm not sure why we need (or why there would ever be viable market for) robot cars and/or robot drivers. Aren't there enough people out of work already?

To comment on a few of your points:
Quote Quote by dipole View Post
We have machines that operate autonomously all the time ...
It's one thing to put a plane in the open sky on autopilot for a while, but auto traffic is another thing. Lots of variables.

Quote Quote by dipole View Post
... trains are capable of driving themselves ...
They're on a track.

Quote Quote by dipole View Post
... most of the technology and goods you own were probably built or assembled using robots at some stage of their manufacture...
Doing very limited, repetitive tasks.

Quote Quote by dipole View Post
If machines can offer a real improvement to human transportation by driving on roads autonomously, why is this a bad thing?
A big if. But assuming that acceptable robot driving technology is someday developed, who's going to be able to afford to buy it? Would it put a certain segment of the population out of work?

Quote Quote by dipole View Post
Is a robot really less trustworthy than some teenager who's texting/blaring music/chatting with friends/and being reckless all at the same time while driving? We allow them to drive, and in fact the number one cause of deaths among young people is car accidents.
This assumes that robot cars/drivers are going to be implemented on a massive scale wrt individual vehicles.

A simpler solution to the problem of teen driving is to raise the driving age.
Gokul43201
#44
Mar5-12, 04:35 PM
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Quote Quote by ThomasT View Post
Would it put a certain segment of the population out of work?
If we'd bowed to the seemingly unpleasant ramifications of this question every time someone promoted a technological advancement, we'd probably be a population with a 100% employment rate, but everyone would be either hunting or gathering.
ThomasT
#45
Mar5-12, 06:06 PM
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Quote Quote by Gokul43201 View Post
If we'd bowed to the seemingly unpleasant ramifications of this question every time someone promoted a technological advancement, we'd probably be a population with a 100% employment rate, but everyone would be either hunting or gathering.
You might be right about that. Anyway, I think they're a long way from putting taxi, bus, and truck drivers out of work. Just too many variables for robots to safely handle I think. But I might be wrong about that.
CaptFirePanda
#46
Mar5-12, 06:51 PM
P: 27
We'll likely see robotic public servants first.
wuliheron
#47
Mar5-12, 09:21 PM
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Quote Quote by CaptFirePanda View Post
We'll likely see robotic public servants first.
The next republican candidate for president maybe?
SW VandeCarr
#48
Mar5-12, 10:08 PM
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Quote Quote by CaptFirePanda View Post
We'll likely see robotic public servants first.
Not if the public service unions have anything to say about it, and they do!
ThomasT
#49
Mar5-12, 10:34 PM
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Quote Quote by CaptFirePanda View Post
We'll likely see robotic public servants first.
Or just servants. Yeah, I can see that. But still, a niche market.
Ryan_m_b
#50
Mar6-12, 01:20 AM
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Quote Quote by ThomasT View Post
You might be right about that. Anyway, I think they're a long way from putting taxi, bus, and truck drivers out of work. Just too many variables for robots to safely handle I think. But I might be wrong about that.
There's also the question of whether or not it would create jobs. It's not a straight jump to self driving cars but the SARTRE project requires people to drive trucks all day up and down main highways. Also there may be the possibility for this to create jobs by making commuting far easier for people e.g if a fleet of public transport self-driving cars was put into operation in an area of transport poverty. This will be aided by the increased speed that self-drive cars have the potential to travel at (IMO) thanks to all the cars driving as one block (no erratic driving slowing everyone down), cross roads replaced by smooth merging (cars turn into spaces made for them) and on major roads speed limits can be increased to whatever the cars can take without the risk of accidents.
Quote Quote by CaptFirePanda View Post
We'll likely see robotic public servants first.
I would wager that this falls under a similar thing to AI: once we can do it we'll no longer call it a robot.
ThomasT
#51
Mar6-12, 03:39 AM
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Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
There's also the question of whether or not it would create jobs. It's not a straight jump to self driving cars but the SARTRE project requires people to drive trucks all day up and down main highways. Also there may be the possibility for this to create jobs by making commuting far easier for people ...
I don't think the inability to commute is a major factor wrt unemployment. But automation, outsourcing and offshoring certainly are.

Millions of jobs which were formerly done by American people are now done by computers, or robots, or foreign labor.

As far as I can tell, no matter how this is parsed, it doesn't seem to me to be a good thing. At least not for Americans.
MarcoD
#52
Mar6-12, 04:12 AM
P: 98
Quote Quote by Ryan_m_b View Post
There's also the question of whether or not it would create jobs. It's not a straight jump to self driving cars but the SARTRE project requires people to drive trucks all day up and down main highways.
This is most likely a solution to congestion; the fact that other drivers don't need to steer is only a benefit. Though I guess it may be interesting to see what happens if one of the other drivers falls asleep.
Borg
#53
Mar6-12, 05:51 AM
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I like the idea of robotic cars and think that they will probably outperform humans - especially with regards to paying attention. In fact, I look forward to the day when a car automatically drives whenever the 'driver' is texting or talking on the phone.

With regards to rootX's post on the first page, I wouldn't be surprised that most people eventually wouldn't even know how to drive. I could easily see GenX-ers someday telling their grandchildren that they remember when cars didn't drive themselves.
Office_Shredder
#54
Mar6-12, 07:14 AM
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And every action movie will include a scene where the automatic driver gets killed for some reason and the hero has to steer the car down an empty street at 25 mph


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