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Is a Euler or an Euler correct?

by mikeph
Tags: a euler, an euler, correct
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mikeph
#1
Nov29-12, 11:17 AM
P: 1,212
Given the pronunciation sounds like "oiler", which article do we use?

Couldn't find the grammar forum!
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Michael Redei
#2
Nov29-12, 11:32 AM
P: 181
Since "oiler" begins with a vowel, it's "an Euler". In days of old, children would have known that even before they learned what an Euler is, as you can see in this playground song:

What noise annoys an Euler?
Oh tell me, tell me do.
What noise annoys an Euler
And gets him in a stew?
Of all the noisy noises
Along the sea and coast,
I tell ya boys, a noisy noise
Annoys an Euler most!

(Okay, it should be "oyster" and not "Euler", but the principle's the same.)
marxLynx
#3
Dec22-12, 05:57 PM
P: 7
Euler is a name, and hence it is a proper noun. In this case, we do not say "an Euler" because Euler is a person. Saying "an --" implies that there are multiple cases, i.e. more than one Euler. However, if the name is attached to some mathematical object, then you can say "an Euler constant," because there may be multiple cases. The Euler in this case is treated as a simple noun.

Curious3141
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Dec22-12, 06:30 PM
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Is a Euler or an Euler correct?

Quote Quote by marxLynx View Post
Euler is a name, and hence it is a proper noun. In this case, we do not say "an Euler" because Euler is a person. Saying "an --" implies that there are multiple cases, i.e. more than one Euler. However, if the name is attached to some mathematical object, then you can say "an Euler constant," because there may be multiple cases. The Euler in this case is treated as a simple noun.
No, there are instances when one may wish to use the phrase "an Euler". For example, "When will we see another genius the likes of an Euler, a Newton, or an Einstein?" is perfectly good grammar.

And, as to the OP's question, it's "an" because the vowel sound used in the actual pronunciation is what matters in determining the indefinite article.
Jimmy Snyder
#5
Dec22-12, 07:44 PM
P: 2,179
Unless you mispronounce Euler as many do. In that case, it's a Euler.
Chi Meson
#6
Dec22-12, 08:10 PM
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This sounds like an unique situation that deserves a honest answer.
AlephZero
#7
Dec23-12, 09:54 AM
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Quote Quote by Jimmy Snyder View Post
Unless you mispronounce Euler as many do. In that case, it's a Euler.
Or conversely, the thing you put on the fire at Christmas is an Eul log.
Curious3141
#8
Dec23-12, 10:08 AM
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Quote Quote by AlephZero View Post
Or conversely, the thing you put on the fire at Christmas is an Eul log.
Stop pouring Eul on the fire.
Jimmy Snyder
#9
Dec23-12, 10:13 AM
P: 2,179
Wait. Are we talking about the mathematician Leonhard Euler, or his football player brother Houston Euler?
Danger
#10
Dec23-12, 10:51 AM
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Quote Quote by Jimmy Snyder View Post
Wait. Are we talking about the mathematician Leonhard Euler, or his football player brother Houston Euler?
Don't you mean Edmonton Euler, which is the only kind that counts?
lisab
#11
Dec23-12, 03:06 PM
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I had some deliciously Euley French fries the other day.
I like Serena
#12
Dec23-12, 03:12 PM
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So I guess it's a Euclid element.


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