Splitting light into colors, mathematical expression (fourier transforms)


by FordDJ22
Tags: colors, expression, fourier, light, mathematical, splitting, transforms
FordDJ22
FordDJ22 is offline
#1
Dec4-12, 07:58 PM
P: 4
I am trying to solve a problem that includes a function of the light hitting a certain area. My question is, how would I change a function G(x) of photons hitting a certain area to include just photons of a certain wavelength, say red light. I feel like this could be accomplished using a fourier transform and de broglie's law, but I'm not sure. Can someone please help, just for a general gaussian function G(x)?
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Jano L.
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#2
Dec4-12, 09:02 PM
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What does this function represent? It may help if you post more detailed specification of your problem.
FordDJ22
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#3
Dec5-12, 04:54 PM
P: 4
Basically, given a function that gives the number of photons hitting a certain area, I want a mathematical way to determine how many of those photons are of a specific frequency (such as red light).

cattlecattle
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#4
Dec5-12, 05:07 PM
P: 32

Splitting light into colors, mathematical expression (fourier transforms)


Quote Quote by FordDJ22 View Post
Basically, given a function that gives the number of photons hitting a certain area, I want a mathematical way to determine how many of those photons are of a specific frequency (such as red light).
I don't think you can get that distribution simply from the number of photons hitting the area. One thing does not lead to another. You can perfectly have N photons with all kinds of different frequency distribution.
You mentioned Fourier Transform, yes, it does transform between time domain to frequency domain, but here the "frequency" has a different meaning than what you might have in mind (it means the spatial periodicity of the underlying time-domain function, not the frequency of the EM wave)
FordDJ22
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#5
Dec5-12, 05:31 PM
P: 4
Quote Quote by cattlecattle View Post
I don't think you can get that distribution simply from the number of photons hitting the area. One thing does not lead to another. You can perfectly have N photons with all kinds of different frequency distribution.
You mentioned Fourier Transform, yes, it does transform between time domain to frequency domain, but here the "frequency" has a different meaning than what you might have in mind (it means the spatial periodicity of the underlying time-domain function, not the frequency of the EM wave)
Ok, then how would this look specifically for a Gaussian slit experiment? Does that give the frequency distribution you were looking for?


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