Planning to buy a first telescope?


by turbo
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Chronos
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#217
Feb25-13, 04:21 PM
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You will discover yourself drawn to widefield eyepieces for general observing. I would suggest something in the 20mm range for this purpose. For planetary viewing, a 9mm ep along with a 2x barlow is a good choice. Unbarlowed it will yield 133x, which will be just about ideal on most nights. With 2x barlow, you can get 266x, which is about as much useful magnification as you can coax out of an 8" primary under very good seeing conditions. In theory, you push it to as much as 400x, but, that assumes near perfect optics and seeing conditions. Not terribly realistic. Owl astronomy has a good selection of good quality eyepieces like these at very reasonable prices.
AnTiFreeze3
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#218
Feb25-13, 09:16 PM
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Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
You will discover yourself drawn to widefield eyepieces for general observing. I would suggest something in the 20mm range for this purpose. For planetary viewing, a 9mm ep along with a 2x barlow is a good choice. Unbarlowed it will yield 133x, which will be just about ideal on most nights. With 2x barlow, you can get 266x, which is about as much useful magnification as you can coax out of an 8" primary under very good seeing conditions. In theory, you push it to as much as 400x, but, that assumes near perfect optics and seeing conditions. Not terribly realistic. Owl astronomy has a good selection of good quality eyepieces like these at very reasonable prices.
Just a quick pointer about OWL astronomy; it's a family-run business, and one of their family members is currently recovering from a stroke. I know this after some short email exchanges, where I originally inquired about several of my purchases that had to be refunded due to my purchased items not being in stock, despite seeing the items openly offered on their website, with no warning of them being out of stock.

This isn't to say that they are a bad business; they aren't. I would just expect some unpredictably with certain items.
QuantumPion
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#219
Feb26-13, 08:20 AM
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I'm trying to keep my EP budget around ~$120 for now. I can't decide between getting a ~12mm EP and a barlow or just one good ~6mm EP. I'm thinking about getting a Baader Planetarium Hyperion, but can't decide between 5, 8, 10 or 13mm and/or barlow to go with it.
Chronos
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#220
Feb26-13, 09:59 AM
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You may wish to peruse ebay, as well. You can usually find a variety of both planetary and wide field eyepieces that are relatively inexpensive.
Ravi Mandavi
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#221
Sep20-13, 02:17 AM
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Hello all, i am beginner in astronomy and want to buy a telescope (which will be my first) but don't know much about it. i am seeking for telescope to see up to nebulas and galaxy, i found some telescope on one online site, they are-
http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-tr...me_binocular_5

http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-la...me_binocular_1

http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-tr...me_binocular_3

are these telescope able to show galaxies and nebulas ?
Drakkith
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#222
Sep20-13, 02:48 AM
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Quote Quote by Ravi Mandavi View Post
Hello all, i am beginner in astronomy and want to buy a telescope (which will be my first) but don't know much about it. i am seeking for telescope to see up to nebulas and galaxy, i found some telescope on one online site, they are-
http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-tr...me_binocular_5

http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-la...me_binocular_1

http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-tr...me_binocular_3

are these telescope able to show galaxies and nebulas ?
Where do you plan to observe from? Anywhere near a city?
Ravi Mandavi
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#223
Sep20-13, 06:59 AM
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I live in small town of india with small light pollution but few away km. from my house there are some places with nearly zero light pollution, so not much concerned about light pollution.
davenn
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#224
Sep20-13, 07:23 PM
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They are all very similar the first one 70mm aperture the other 2 are 50mm

personally I would go for the 70mm

the almost more important thing is... the one with the sturdiest (strongest) tripod
There is little to be gained with really good optics on a poor tripod that wobbles and vibrates with the slighest touch

Celestron are a good brand, they have been making scopes for a good number of years
My current main scope is a Celestron CPC 9.25"

I think any one of those 3 would do you well and you would be able to have a good play looking around the skies and at a later date if your astronomy interest continues to grow, then you can always look at a larger scope

regards
Dave
Drakkith
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Sep20-13, 07:50 PM
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Quote Quote by Ravi Mandavi View Post
I live in small town of india with small light pollution but few away km. from my house there are some places with nearly zero light pollution, so not much concerned about light pollution.
First, I want to make sure you understand the view of nebulae in a telescope is NOT anything like the pictures you see everywhere. Other than the stars in/around the nebulae, you will see dim fuzzy objects and that's it. There will be very very little detail and almost no color in anything but the brightest nebulae.

Still, I enjoy visual observing from time to time. Especially the planets and the moon, they are a real treat when visible, and not even a photograph can compare to seeing Saturn or Jupiter through a telescope yourself.
PhysicoRaj
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#226
Nov17-13, 06:30 AM
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Hi,
After all these years of naked eye observations, I finally decided to get a telescope. So, I chose this:
Celestron Powerseeker 60AZ Telescope
http://www.flipkart.com/celestron-po...9-fce0e5179222

I've read the reviews but I can't imagine how deep sky objects would look like. This has a 60mm aperture of 700mm focal length. A 3x barlow is also provided. A 20mm eyepiece and a 4mm eyepiece give 35x and 175x magnification respectively. But I think 175x is too much for a 60mm objective to handle. Is it so? If so, should I use the barlow with the 20mm eyepiece, which would give around 105x?
Will I be able to see the rings of saturn? Cloud bands of jupiter? How would nebulae and galaxies appear in this?
Thanks for any guidance/suggestions.
jim hardy
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#227
Nov19-13, 07:05 PM
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I first saw rings of Saturn with an inexpensive 10X-30X zoom terrestial scope from K-mart
which got me so excited i bought an inexpensive 4" celestron reflector

and had a LOT of fun....
but i am no expert, there are experts here

above 60X it becomes difficult for me to aim and hold the 'scope steady. At 60X i can see that jupiter is not uniform, but cannot make out stripes. As i said it's an inexpensive scope with probably a modest mirror.

plan on finding you need a pretty good mount. I recently found an equatorial mount in a thrift shop which i plan to affix to that little Celestron(which is now 38 years old).

I also have a surplus WW2 aerial reconnaissance lens, Bell and Howell probably 8 inches across with 1 meter focal length. I figure it was probably a really good lens in 1945, and this winter hope to get it in a tube with eyepiece. Has anybody experience to share with such a contraption?

old jim
Chronos
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#228
Nov19-13, 09:39 PM
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Surplus WW2 recon lenses are quick sellers on ebay, which suggests they are of good optical quality. Just one thing to note. Those lenses were frequently made using thorium glass which can be radioactive. Yellowing is the usual symptom. There may not be enough radioactivity to be dangerous, but, probably worth checking.
PhysicoRaj
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#229
Nov25-13, 09:45 AM
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Quote Quote by jim hardy View Post
I first saw rings of Saturn with an inexpensive 10X-30X zoom terrestial scope from K-mart
I got the telescope a few days ago.
I think I will not be able to see Saturn's rings. Saturn is low on the horizon and shaking makes it impossible for me now. I'll have to wait.
Jupiter's bands are a fizzle. May be I should try on more magnification and long time observing. The Galilean moons are visible.
But the moon is still amazing through this..at high magnification, I had to wrestle with the mounts to get it in view but fantastic after that.
Fermifaq
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#230
Nov25-13, 11:37 AM
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Venus Jupiter and Moon Conjunction HD Timelapse
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZiYhzJ8jiAg

Huge Full Moon Rise - Realtime 2600mm 720p
http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotat...&v=n_wt0M8vm0c


MOON ZOOM 1600x digital zoom
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1L_1wuj_Js



Ive been quite impressed with the latest digital cameras. Frame stacking with Desire or registax sounds quite appealing.

The light quality where i am is very poor indeed so i would need to build a radio telescope or a very very large optical telescope with a lot of computational processing in order to get anything worthwhile image wise. A 3 meter dish, something like that anyway.
DHF
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#231
Apr7-14, 08:52 AM
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Hello folks. The last time I owned a telescope was about 30 years ago in New York. My dad and I used it to look at the moon, mainly because that was all we could see in the city ;)

My son has taken an interest in astronomy and seeing as how we currently live a few hours away from a dark sky park, I was considering getting a scope and doing some sky watching with him. I would prefer to start out with something under $150 but I am not sure where the best use of my money would go. I have spent a few days sifting through this thread but most of the discussion on equipment is a little too deep for me.

I would like to get the most magnification for my money but I am not sure what brands or models are known for quality and which are a poor investment. Here is the model I was looking at so far, if you could tell me if I am heading in the right direction I would appreciate it.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...5_0_127mm.html

I don't mind going a few dollars over my stated budget if it will get me markedly better quality.

thank you in advance for any advice you can part my way.

Don

P.S. I am very interested in capturing whatever we see with my DLSR, I have had very little luck in finding information on mounts and adapters for Cameras.
Chronos
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#232
Apr8-14, 01:48 AM
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Magnification should not be a concern. Aperture is far more important. A bigger lens captures more photons and more photons means everything is brighter. You should be able to pick up a basic 4-6" reflector in your price range - although I would not suggest anything over 6". Ease of use is inversely proportionate to the square of the aperture. Astrophotography is a challenging hobby. Prime focus is the easiest route. You need nothing more than an adapter to affix your DLSR to the telescope focuser - which should be less than $50. You can tweak the focus using the view screen on your camera for bright objects, like the moon and planets.
DHF
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#233
Apr8-14, 11:07 AM
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ok that is good to know. brings it down to two models.
For $130:
-127mm
-f/8
-1000mm focal length
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...5_0_127mm.html

and for $234:
-130mm
-f/5
-650mm focal length
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...130_EQ_MD.html

The more expensive scope has only 65% of the magnification but its a full stop brighter and you stressed that brightness was more important. Will the larger aperture of the more expensive scope make it that superior to the less expensive one? Or at my skill level should I opt for the cheaper model until I have enough experience to make use of the more expensive models?
Chronos
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#234
Apr8-14, 09:04 PM
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The 130 EQ is the better choice, IMO. The aperture difference is negligible, f5 v f8 is not. It will be much brighter, have a larger field of view, and better portability. It also has a better mount. These differences easily justify the extra $100.


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