Kerr Effect


by ajdecker1022
Tags: effect, kerr
ajdecker1022
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#1
Sep6-13, 09:21 PM
P: 10
I'm wondering about the Kerr Optical effect as described on wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerr_effect

Are there limits to the range of parameters at which the effect starts to break down? What λ values and E values does this formula apply to?
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UltrafastPED
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#2
Sep8-13, 10:21 AM
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P: 1,305
The Kerr optical effect is non-linear and material dependent. You should be able to find tabulated values for common materials.

The comments at the very bottom of the article are important; the simple formula for index of refraction that is intensity dependent is a linearization which is good enough for starters. But if you apply too much intensity your material is damaged; I have ruined a number of lenses with ultrafast laser pulses unintentionally.
ajdecker1022
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#3
Sep8-13, 08:49 PM
P: 10
Do those comments apply to the Kerr electro-optic effect? From what I can tell, it's referring specifically to the AC form of it. Do you know where I could find tabulated data for Kerr constants and such? The wiki article mentions a few, such as water (which is what I'm mainly interested in), but I was wondering about others. Google didn't give me much so far...

UltrafastPED
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#4
Sep9-13, 01:03 AM
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P: 1,305

Kerr Effect


Try search terms optical handbook kerr.


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