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Hooke's law - Natural Extension of Spring

by Emz19
Tags: extension, hooke, natural, spring
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Emz19
#1
Apr18-14, 03:02 PM
P: 11
Can I find out the natural extension of a spring if I am only given the mass of a block that can be put on it and the value of the spring constant? I have found x ( from the formula F = -kx ) when the block is on it but I now need to find the extension of the spring with no mass on the end. It is probably really simple but I am just a little stuck! Thanks
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ModusPwnd
#2
Apr18-14, 03:19 PM
P: 1,072
With no mass attached, what is F? Plug that value in and solve for x. Or am I missing something?
Emz19
#3
Apr18-14, 03:35 PM
P: 11
well I thought with no mass the force is zero but then is the k equal to x? See, i was getting a big answer then for x and it didnt seem like the right answer. I am definitely missing something very obvious here

paisiello2
#4
Apr18-14, 03:45 PM
P: 558
Hooke's law - Natural Extension of Spring

How heavy is the spring itself? Is the spring vertical or horizontal?
Emz19
#5
Apr18-14, 03:48 PM
P: 11
The spring is vertical and the question does not give the mass of the spring.
ModusPwnd
#6
Apr18-14, 03:56 PM
P: 1,072
Quote Quote by Emz19 View Post
well I thought with no mass the force is zero but then is the k equal to x?
No, k is not equal to x in that case. Recall your algebra, you have to do the same thing to both sides to isolate the variable you want. Solve for x by doing the same thing to both sides then plug in 0 for mass/force (you can plug in the zero first, but its usually easier to solve first then plug in).
Emz19
#7
Apr18-14, 04:15 PM
P: 11
Ok great, thanks a mill :)


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