Register to reply

Wavelenght, frequencies

by JPC
Tags: frequencies, wavelenght
Share this thread:
JPC
#1
Jun15-07, 07:03 AM
P: 230
hey how come the IR heat up materials more than UV ?
and why people say IR go longer distances

the way i see it :

UV have faster frequencies, they should have more energy
while IR have slower frequencies, should have less energy

or is it that when hitting a electron , photons that vibrate faster transfer less energy to the electron ?

---

and as for the distance , i thought photons would carry on forever
so is it that high frenquence photons loose their energy faster ?

---
and do photons see their frequencies slower as they get in contact with matter ?
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Step lightly: All-optical transistor triggered by single photon promises advances in quantum applications
The unifying framework of symmetry reveals properties of a broad range of physical systems
What time is it in the universe?
russ_watters
#2
Jun15-07, 07:54 AM
Mentor
P: 22,300
Quote Quote by JPC View Post
hey how come the IR heat up materials more than UV ?
It doesn't, unless there is a difference in how certain materials aborb different wavelengths.
and why people say IR go longer distances
It doesn't.
the way i see it :

UV have faster frequencies, they should have more energy
while IR have slower frequencies, should have less energy
Not faster or slower, higher and lower, but yes.
or is it that when hitting a electron , photons that vibrate faster transfer less energy to the electron ?
Essentially yes.
and as for the distance , i thought photons would carry on forever
so is it that high frenquence photons loose their energy faster ?
They will carry on forever if they don't hit anything.
and do photons see their frequencies slower as they get in contact with matter ?
That one I'm not sure about - there may be an effect like that in refraction.
ice109
#3
Jun15-07, 08:29 AM
P: 1,705
Quote Quote by russ_watters View Post
That one I'm not sure about - there may be an effect like that in refraction.
i don't think the frequency changes, the wavelength and the velocity do though


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Wavelenght of the incident light Introductory Physics Homework 5
Mean thermal wavelenght General Physics 3
RGB to wavelenght or viceversa. General Physics 5
What wavelenght is expected for light composed of photons Chemistry 4
Wavelenght of Visible Light? General Physics 14