electric field and magnetic field relationship


by bernhard.rothenstein
Tags: electric, field, magnetic, relationship
bernhard.rothenstein
bernhard.rothenstein is offline
#1
Jul8-07, 05:33 AM
P: 997
We find in the literature the following relationships between electric field E and magnetic field B
B(z)=E(y)V/cc
and
E(y)=VB(z)
Is there a way to define the situations when they hold?
Thanks
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olgranpappy
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#2
Jul8-07, 01:09 PM
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apparently only if v^2=c^2 for nonzero fields
Meir Achuz
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#3
Jul10-07, 07:41 PM
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Your first expression is the relation between B and E for a charged particle moving in the x direction.
Your second expression is for a different situation.It gives the relation between
E'_y and B'_z if you are moving with velocity v in the x direction with respect to a pure magnetic field (no E) B_z.

bernhard.rothenstein
bernhard.rothenstein is offline
#4
Jul10-07, 09:28 PM
P: 997

electric field and magnetic field relationship


Quote Quote by Meir Achuz View Post
Your first expression is the relation between B and E for a charged particle moving in the x direction.
Your second expression is for a different situation.It gives the relation between
E'_y and B'_z if you are moving with velocity v in the x direction with respect to a pure magnetic field (no E) B_z.
thanks. is there a special name for E' in the second case?
bernhard.rothenstein
bernhard.rothenstein is offline
#5
Jul11-07, 10:52 PM
P: 997
Quote Quote by Meir Achuz View Post
Your first expression is the relation between B and E for a charged particle moving in the x direction.
Your second expression is for a different situation.It gives the relation between
E'_y and B'_z if you are moving with velocity v in the x direction with respect to a pure magnetic field (no E) B_z.
Consider please the equation
F/q=uxB
If I call E=F/q E has that E a special name?
Thanks.


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