Register to reply

Explosives Question

by Chaos' lil bro Order
Tags: explosives
Share this thread:
Chaos' lil bro Order
#1
May11-08, 04:34 AM
P: 683
Consider a sphere of C4 explosives compound, the size of your fist. The C4 has a fuse with its end sticking into the sphere's exact center. So we assume that the initial point of explosion will be the exact center of the C4 sphere. We also assume that the C4 sphere is of a uniform density. When the sphere explodes, how does it happen? I mean, if the sphere had 3 layers that we could imagine, the core (innermost), mantle (middle), and crust (outer), how would these layers explode outwards? Some questions that arise are does the core explode through the other layers and push through them, or does the core impart momentum to the mantle, then the mantle to the crust and the crust into the surrounding air medium?

What do you think?
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Mapping the optimal route between two quantum states
Spin-based electronics: New material successfully tested
Verifying the future of quantum computing
lightarrow
#2
May11-08, 02:05 PM
P: 1,521
Quote Quote by Chaos' lil bro Order View Post
Consider a sphere of C4 explosives compound, the size of your fist. The C4 has a fuse with its end sticking into the sphere's exact center. So we assume that the initial point of explosion will be the exact center of the C4 sphere. We also assume that the C4 sphere is of a uniform density. When the sphere explodes, how does it happen? I mean, if the sphere had 3 layers that we could imagine, the core (innermost), mantle (middle), and crust (outer), how would these layers explode outwards? Some questions that arise are does the core explode through the other layers and push through them, or does the core impart momentum to the mantle, then the mantle to the crust and the crust into the surrounding air medium?

What do you think?
Your problem is substantially equivalent to this: you have three iron balls of the same mass and dimensions, A, B and C, bound with 2 massless springs from A and B and from B and C, the system is constrained on a straight line.

If you push ahead the ball A, what happens to B and C? How do they move? Clearly, the movement of A makes a force on B through the first spring, so B starts moving so making a force on C through the second spring...you can go on with as many balls and springs you like. The balls are the atoms, the springs are interatomic forces.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Why was cordite invented? Chemistry 9
Deuterium-Tritium explosives High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics 5
Uber Explosives Chemistry 6
What makes compounds explosive? Atomic, Solid State, Comp. Physics 3