2^x derivitive


by hackensack
Tags: derivitive
hackensack
hackensack is offline
#1
May19-04, 04:10 PM
P: 2
I need to find the derivitive of y=2^x using the definition of derivitive.
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
SensaBubble: It's a bubble, but not as we know it (w/ video)
The hemihelix: Scientists discover a new shape using rubber bands (w/ video)
Microbes provide insights into evolution of human language
Hurkyl
Hurkyl is offline
#2
May19-04, 04:30 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Hurkyl's Avatar
P: 16,101
What have you done so far? What does the definition of derivative say?
HallsofIvy
HallsofIvy is offline
#3
May21-04, 05:28 AM
Math
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
Thanks
PF Gold
P: 38,898
This was also posted in the calculus section and there are about 10 replies there.

mathwonk
mathwonk is offline
#4
Sep21-04, 08:27 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
mathwonk's Avatar
P: 9,428

2^x derivitive


I doubt this is a suitable problem for a novice. even showing convergence is tough. i will look at the other posted answers. there is a good reason people start from the integral definition of ln(x) to derive this result.
HallsofIvy
HallsofIvy is offline
#5
Sep21-04, 09:17 PM
Math
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
Thanks
PF Gold
P: 38,898
If f(x)= ax, the f(x+h)= aa+x= axah so
f(a+ h)- f(a)= ax(ah- 1).

The derivative is lim (f(x+h)- f(x))/h= axlim {(ah-1)/h}. Notice that that is ax time a limit that is independent of x. That is, as long as the derivative exists, it is ax times a constant. The problem is showing that the lim{(ah-1)/h} EXISTS! And then showing that, if a= 2, that limit is ln(2).

Showing that that limit exists is sufficiently non-trivial that many people (myself included), as mathwonk said, prefer to define ln(x) as the integral, from 1 to x of (1/t)dt. From that, it is possible to prove all properties of ln(x) including (trivially) that the derivative is 1/x. Defining ex as the inverse function of ln(x) leads to all the properties of ex (including the fact that it is some number to a power!), in particular that its derivative is ex itself and, from that, that the derivative of ax is (ln a) ax.
quantitative
quantitative is offline
#6
Oct15-04, 07:23 AM
P: 3
dunno if i'm missing the point here but...

write
y=2^x
as
y=exp(x.ln2)
=>
y'=ln2.exp(x.ln2)
cepheid
cepheid is offline
#7
Oct16-04, 02:53 AM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
cepheid's Avatar
P: 5,198
No, you did exactly what HallsofIvy was advocating, he was just pointing out that the question asked for it to be solved using the definition of a derivative, which makes things much harder. Easier to approach things from the other way, starting by defining the integral of 1/x.
brout
brout is offline
#8
Oct29-04, 12:11 PM
P: 5
"The derivative is lim (f(x+h)- f(x))/h= axlim {(ah-1)/h}. Notice that that is ax time a limit that is independent of x. That is, as long as the derivative exists, it is ax times a constant. The problem is showing that the lim{(ah-1)/h} EXISTS! And then showing that, if a= 2, that limit is ln(2)."

tell me if i'm wrong, but it doesn't seems so hard to determine this limit..
(a^h-1)/h = (exp (h*ln(a) )-1) / h
= ( 1 + h*ln(a) + o(h*ln(a)) - 1 ) / h h->0
= ln(a) + o(ln(a))
so lim (a^h-1)/h = ln(a) .......
HallsofIvy
HallsofIvy is offline
#9
Oct29-04, 01:32 PM
Math
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
Thanks
PF Gold
P: 38,898
Quote Quote by brout
"The derivative is lim (f(x+h)- f(x))/h= axlim {(ah-1)/h}. Notice that that is ax time a limit that is independent of x. That is, as long as the derivative exists, it is ax times a constant. The problem is showing that the lim{(ah-1)/h} EXISTS! And then showing that, if a= 2, that limit is ln(2)."

tell me if i'm wrong, but it doesn't seems so hard to determine this limit..
(a^h-1)/h = (exp (h*ln(a) )-1) / h
= ( 1 + h*ln(a) + o(h*ln(a)) - 1 ) / h h->0
= ln(a) + o(ln(a))
so lim (a^h-1)/h = ln(a) .......
Yes, assuming that you know "(exp (h*ln(a) )-1) / h= ( 1 + h*ln(a) + o(h*ln(a)) - 1 ) / h " its easy to do it. Proving what you assumed is the hard part!


Register to reply

Related Discussions
derivitive problems Calculus & Beyond Homework 7
Simple Derivitive Calculus & Beyond Homework 3
Derivitive Introductory Physics Homework 2
derivitive of 2^x Calculus 18
Need Anti-Derivitive Help Calculus 5