Concentrated moment?


by WatermelonPig
Tags: concentrated, moment
WatermelonPig
WatermelonPig is offline
#1
Feb26-11, 12:50 PM
P: 140
Suppossedly, it is a possible for a moment to occur (with the same magnitude) at any point along a beam. But this not mean that there is any corresponding force. (So if you choose a point to calculate the moment about, the concentrated moment is a constant). So, how exactly does this work?
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Studiot
Studiot is offline
#2
Feb26-11, 01:58 PM
P: 5,462
Since your question makes no sense otherwise I am going to assume you mean zero shear force and that you understand beam loadings for shear and moment.

The attachment shows a two span continuous beam with a uniform loading.

Beneath are shear and moment diagrams.

Notice that at certain sections the shear force is zero - this corresponds to local maxima in the bending moment.

Depending upon the sign convention you use, you may be familiar with such diagrams the other way up.
Attached Thumbnails
shear_moment.jpg  


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