Register to reply

1 = v^2 + t^2? and look at spacetime as velocity as x axis, time as y axis.

by darkhorror
Tags: axis, spacetime, time, velocity
Share this thread:
darkhorror
#1
Jan12-12, 06:45 PM
P: 140
I am not so sure how to explain this. But when looking at sqrt( 1 - v^2/c^2 ) for time dilation. It seems to follow that you may be able to think about it as 1 = v^2 + t^2 if look at v as fraction of c, and t as the amount a clock will be dilated.

Then you could think about it in your frame of reference that all objects are moving at 1 through spacetime. If the velocity of an object gets larger then that just means that the t gets smaller.
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Final pieces to the circadian clock puzzle found
A spray-on light show on four wheels: Darkside Scientific
How an ancient vertebrate uses familiar tools to build a strange-looking head
ghwellsjr
#2
Jan12-12, 08:08 PM
PF Gold
P: 4,781
You explained it very well. The equation you derived is for the reciprocal of gamma, the time dilation factor. It plots as a circle. See this post:
http://physicsforums.com/showpost.ph...81&postcount=6
HotBuffet
#3
Jan13-12, 09:34 AM
P: 4
I think it's more like sqrt(x^2 + y^2 + z^2 + t^2) = 1
4 dimensional law of pythagoras, using space and time.

next step is using this to understand / work out a twin paradox :)

jedishrfu
#4
Jan13-12, 10:12 AM
P: 3,091
1 = v^2 + t^2? and look at spacetime as velocity as x axis, time as y axis.

that should be a - t^2 right?
elfmotat
#5
Jan13-12, 03:08 PM
elfmotat's Avatar
P: 261
Quote Quote by HotBuffet View Post
I think it's more like sqrt(x^2 + y^2 + z^2 + t^2) = 1
4 dimensional law of pythagoras, using space and time.

next step is using this to understand / work out a twin paradox :)
Do you mean s2=-t2+x2+y2+z2 ? The OP wasn't talking about the interval. He was talking about the relationship between time dilation and velocity.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
How to find angular momentum of a body about an axis other than the axis of rotation? Introductory Physics Homework 11
Earth's axis of spin w.r.t. galactic rotation axis Astronomy & Astrophysics 6
Why are Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines used other than Vertical Axis? General Physics 3
When using a curved axis for connected objects, do you return to a regular axis in th Introductory Physics Homework 1
Finding new major axis of ellipse after stretching along arbitrary axis Differential Geometry 4