Register to reply

Newtonian Probability Distributions

Share this thread:
'AQF
#1
Oct29-05, 12:00 PM
P: 33
How would the probability distribution (|psi|^2) look for a Newtonian particle if it were confined in a box?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Apple to unveil 'iWatch' on September 9
NASA deep-space rocket, SLS, to launch in 2018
Study examines 13,000-year-old nanodiamonds from multiple locations across three continents
Gokul43201
#2
Oct29-05, 07:11 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Gokul43201's Avatar
P: 11,155
AQF : We can't say a thing unless you first attempt the problem yourself and show what you've tried. If you didn't actually read the guidelines before agreeing to them, please read the sticky at the top of this forum.

Here it is : http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=94380
'AQF
#3
Oct31-05, 07:52 PM
P: 33
Here is what I got so far:
(I am unable to upload an image for some reason.) I have the probability on the y-axis and x on the x-axis. My probability function is a straight line,
How do you reconcile this with Newtonian Mechanics for high n?

siddharth
#4
Oct31-05, 10:14 PM
HW Helper
PF Gold
siddharth's Avatar
P: 1,197
Newtonian Probability Distributions

AQF, Did you find out the wavefunction for a particle confined in a box? Can you post the wavefunction you got?
'AQF
#5
Oct31-05, 10:37 PM
P: 33
This is just qualitative.
Gokul43201
#6
Oct31-05, 11:24 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Gokul43201's Avatar
P: 11,155
Quote Quote by 'AQF
Here is what I got so far:
(I am unable to upload an image for some reason.) I have the probability on the y-axis and x on the x-axis. My probability function is a straight line,
That's called a uniform probability density.
How do you reconcile this with Newtonian Mechanics for high n?
What is "n" in Newtonian Mechanics ??
'AQF
#7
Nov1-05, 12:15 PM
P: 33
I mean “n”, the number of wave crests in the probability distribution, as defined in quantum mechanics. Apparently, when n is very high, this approximates the Newtonian situation. I cannot figure out why.

Thanks for your help so far.

From your comment, I assume that my idea for the Newtonian Distribution is correct, right?
ZapperZ
#8
Nov1-05, 02:40 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
ZapperZ's Avatar
P: 29,238
There is something VERY weird about this. I've read 3 of the threads that you have started. You seem to be using the "terminology" as used in QM. Yet, I have a very strong suspicion that you do not understand what they are beyond a superficial, literal meaning of the word.

May I know what level of QM you are working on right now?

Zz.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Probability Distributions Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics 4
Probability Distributions Calculus & Beyond Homework 6
Probability Distributions Precalculus Mathematics Homework 5
Probability Distributions Introductory Physics Homework 0
Probability distributions Introductory Physics Homework 0