Recent content by samblohm

  1. S

    Electrons in nucleus?

    Is there any order that the quarks and gluons move around in nucleons?
  2. S

    Electrons in nucleus?

    If I'm not mistaken, that would depend on if the resulting nucleus is heavier than Nickel-56, (or 57? something like that). Lighter and I believe it would have less binding energy and heavier the opposite. Or does the fact that there are still the same number of nucleons mean that it stays the...
  3. S

    Electrons in nucleus?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioac...ng_decay_rates [Broken] "...which are subject to electron capture in 7Be because (like all s atomic orbitals in all atoms) they naturally penetrate into the nucleus." How can the s orbitals penetrate the nucleus without being captured? And do they...
  4. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    ok, I think I understand now. Instead of classifying melting point by covalent or ionic bonds, could they be classified by whether or not they are a network?
  5. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    Halite is made of ionic bonds, so it isn't a covalent network
  6. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    Although they are covalent bonds, I would consider those to be covalent networks instead of standard organic covalent bonds.
  7. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    I suppose your right, those are covalently bonded, but I personally would consider them covalent networks vs a more common organic covalent bond. But, like I said, they really are covalent bonds.
  8. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    Were talking about compounds, not elements so what you listed doesn't apply.
  9. S

    Chlorate polyatomic ion

    In general, the most common oxyanion for an element will end in ate. You will find many trends in the periodic table, but you will also find many exceptions. Some examples I can think of for ate's that have 3 oxygens are nitrate, bromate, iodate, carbonate (although that has a minus 2 charge)...
  10. S

    Chlorate polyatomic ion

    Well actually there is a Perchlorate ion that is ClO4 that has a negative 1 charge so the pattern isn't broken. Chlorine is just very flexible in a sense because it can have anywhere between 1-4 oxygen atoms and still have a minus 1 charge. ClO is Hypochlorite ClO2 is Chlorite ClO3 is...
  11. S

    How much would a laser spread out in space?

    That all depends on how precise and accurate the apparatus is. Assuming it is perfect, which it isn't, it never would. I don't really have numbers for you though.
  12. S

    Experimental fuel choices

    Should have been more specific in some areas. I first meant that compressing the air makes it less dense than what would be ideal because air is not an ideal gas. It heats up when compressed. Obviously compressing it makes it more dense than ambient though. The whole point of this is for power...
  13. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    The reason alkanes don't react is because they are don't have any functional groups. A hydrogen-carbon bond is a more stable alternative to a carbon-carbon double bond. The strength of 2 hydrogen carbon bonds is stronger than one carbon carbon double bond. And it's kinda tough come up with a...
  14. S

    How does electronegativity affect bond strength?

    The farther away the electronegativity of 2 atoms, the stronger the bond generally. Cesium has the lowest, and Fluorine has the highest and the make the strongest ionic bond (well single bond at least). The strongest polar covalent that I can think of is the Carbon-Fluorine bond. And yes ionic...
  15. S

    Experimental fuel choices

    I'm not sure how much background someone reading this may have so I'm gonna go over it kinda thoroughly. In a turbocharged engine, when the turbo compresses air into the intake piping, it heats up and becomes less dense. If the air isn't dense, you can't put as much fuel in so you get less...
Top