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News 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics announcement

  1. Oct 6, 2015 #1

    Orodruin

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  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 6, 2015 #2

    Borg

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    It would be interesting to attend one of those. :smile:
     
  4. Oct 6, 2015 #3

    Orodruin

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    You need a registration, a press ID, and to travel to Stockholm. I only have the last part covered - the Academy is order 1 km away from where I am sitting. :wink:
    Later today we have a colloquium presentation of the Prize here at the AlbaNova University center.
     
  5. Oct 6, 2015 #4

    Orodruin

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    Neutrino oscillations!!!!! :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:
     
  6. Oct 6, 2015 #5

    Orodruin

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    I think I know some experts on this subject ... :rolleyes:
     
  7. Oct 6, 2015 #6

    Orodruin

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  8. Oct 6, 2015 #7

    jtbell

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    Well, I (and the rest of my grad school research group) would have been astonished if I had actually found neutrino oscillations in my dissertation project 33 years ago. :))

    I figured that experiment would get the prize eventually. Congratulations to them! :biggrin:
     
  9. Oct 6, 2015 #8
    Congrats to the winners!!
     
  10. Oct 6, 2015 #9
    @robphy time to get them to UWLAX! :smile:
     
  11. Oct 6, 2015 #10

    Ygggdrasil

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    @mfb wrote a nice Insights article on the topic a few months ago: https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/neutrino-masses-speed

    Somewhat disappointed that it didn't go to Vera Rubin and others for their work on dark matter. Hopefully, she'll still be around when the committee gets around to awarding the next astronomy-related prize.

    [edit: thanks to robphy for pointing out the spelling mistake]
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2015
  12. Oct 6, 2015 #11

    robphy

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    That probably should be Vera Rubin.
     
  13. Oct 6, 2015 #12

    atyy

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    Gosh, I was certain neutrino oscillations wouldn't get the prize this year - I had assumed they had already gotten it! :biggrin:
     
  14. Oct 6, 2015 #13

    Andrew Mason

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    I think congratulations are owed to a lot of people who worked on the Neutrino project, including Dr. McDonald and Dr. Kajita.

    I did my undergraduate degree at Queen's and spent many hours in Stirling Hall. During my 4 years at Queen's I got to know many of the professors who eventually worked on the neutrino mass project with Dr. McDonald, including Dr. Hugh Evans, Dr. George Ewan and Dr. Hay Boon Mak,. During the summer of 1974 I had the pleasure of working there under Dr. Mak, then a research fellow. He was at that time part of the team at the Chalk River nuclear facility and he later went to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory when it was started in the 1980s. While my time at Queens was well before Dr. McDonald arrived, it is quite apparent that he was able to work with a very highly qualified group that worked very well together. I think they all deserve recognition in this.

    AM
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2015
  15. Oct 6, 2015 #14

    Orodruin

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    Art McDonald once asked me back in 2006 or so if I would consider taking up an experimental post-doc with SNO. I guess that is how close I will ever get to work with a Nobel laureate.

    Edit: Also, given my experimental skills, this was probably in the best interest of the collaboration :rolleyes:
     
  16. Oct 6, 2015 #15

    dlgoff

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    Close enough for me. :bow:
     
  17. Oct 6, 2015 #16
    Wow! So does this now mean that there is a greater probability of the 3 neutrino flavors being massive (and having different invariant masses)? What does the scientific community think about Lorentz-violating neutrino oscillations after this?
     
  18. Oct 6, 2015 #17

    Orodruin

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    The results they were awarded the prize for are over a decade old so they are not really news to the scientific community. The results were (and still are) of great importance for the development of the experimental neutrino physics programme as well as for the theoretical developments.

    The flavours themselves do not have specific masses. Instead, they are linear combinations of the different mass eigenstates - much in the same way as a quantum state in a superposition of states with different energy does not have a definite energy, but is a superposition of different energy eigenstates.

    As for Lorentz invariance, neutrino oscillations are working perfectly fine in a Lorentz invariant framework.
     
  19. Oct 6, 2015 #18

    mfb

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    At least two mass eigenstates have to be massive. The third could be massless, but there is no special reason to expect this.
    There have never been Lorentz-violating observations of anything. There was a measurement error from OPERA four years ago that got fixed three years ago.
     
  20. Oct 7, 2015 #19

    mjsd

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    so glad to see this has finally happened. I was in my final years at high school when Super-K announced their results.....
    and somehow I moved into the topic of neutrino models at uni
     
  21. Oct 7, 2015 #20

    Vanadium 50

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    The probability is the same as it was before the prize was awarded, no? Prizes don't influence nature.

    Does that work? I don't think it's as simple as looking at the DeltaM terms. I think that derivation is done under the assumption of three non-zero masses.
     
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