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50th anniversary of the original Star Trek

  1. Sep 8, 2016 #1

    jtbell

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    On September 8, 1966 the first episode of the original Star Trek series was broadcast. I saw it when I was in junior high school (middle school). Tonight I'll pull out my DVD set and watch it again. It's been several years since I last did it. Maybe I'll make it a regular Thursday thing and do the entire series.
     
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  3. Sep 8, 2016 #2

    phinds

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    You did NOT have to point this out. Now I feel old :smile:
     
  4. Sep 8, 2016 #3
    I watched the first season. I skipped half the second season. Then the lovely young lass down the street heard we had just bought a color TV. :wink:
     
  5. Sep 8, 2016 #4

    fresh_42

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    They repeat five TOS shows on TV tonight, based on a poll. Guess which one won!
     
  6. Sep 8, 2016 #5

    jtbell

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    The Trouble with Tribbles? :biggrin:
     
  7. Sep 8, 2016 #6

    Vanadium 50

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    City on the Edge of Forever should win. (With a young Joan Collins no less!) No contest.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2016 #7

    fresh_42

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    Sunday. They will broadcast time travel ones then (2nd of 4). :wink:
    (Didn't know about Joan Collins. You made me curious now.)
     
  9. Sep 12, 2016 #8
    People will be talking and writing about Star Trek 100 years from now. Eventually it will be considered up there with Shakespeare.
     
  10. Sep 12, 2016 #9

    phinds

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    Uh ... yeah. Probably not. They may be talking about it, but comparing it to Shakespear? Very doubtful
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2016
  11. Sep 12, 2016 #10
    Its been 50 years and they are talking about it. Star Trek's influence on society, vis. science, technology, language, humor, has already been enormous. I don't think most people outside college or some authors know much about Shakespeare. They probably heard of Romeo and Juliet, perhaps the word "Hamlet", and not much more. We, well not "we", won't know for a hundred years.
     
  12. Sep 12, 2016 #11

    phinds

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    Actually, you do have a point. As our society continues to dumb down in terms of people learning literature and history, what you suggest becomes more and more likely although if they get to that point they likely won't be comparing it to Shakespeare because they will have never heard of Shakespeare. The few people left who DO know Shakespeare well are not likely to think that a cheesy space opera is in the same league.
     
  13. Sep 12, 2016 #12
    The hype doth exceed all expectations of a more grand eloquence of plot, methinks.
     
  14. Sep 12, 2016 #13

    fresh_42

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    I think there are basically three attracting properties.

    Firstly, the human dream about equality among different races, cultures, religions etc. came to existence. It's been e.g. the reason why Whoopi Goldberg wanted to take part in it. They actually created a role for her. Many countries have this equality as a crucial part of their constitution. However, I don't know a single one in which it is actually achieved.

    Secondly, there are no physical needs anymore. No money required. No hunger. Everyone has shelter and can concentrate on his/her individual talents.

    And last but not least, the (pure?!) logic which came in with Vulcans. I found it a very attractive way in judging the world as a child and Spock has been my favorite character. And I cannot rule out its influence on me that made me study logical concepts rather than social fields. In the end it is even part of the reason why I just right now type in my comment here.

    So although Roddenberry might not be comparable to Shakespeare, his philosophy definitely is comparable to our (constituted) dreams and goals and therefore deserves to remain quoted. Even in a century from now.
     
  15. Sep 12, 2016 #14

    davenn

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    They started playing it here on afternoon TV on one of the Free to air channels ... I get home from work, put my feet up and enjoy the 5 - 6pm session

    Actually, star trek voyager has been playing in that time slot till late last week when they changed to ST TOS for the anniversary


    Dave
     
  16. Sep 12, 2016 #15

    fresh_42

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    Do you belong to these people, too, I once had the following dialog with?
    Me: "I admit, when I was young I fell for Uhura a little."
    Response: "We all fell for her at the time."

    Maybe it had to do with the combination of our age and the length of her uniform ...
     
  17. Sep 12, 2016 #16

    jtbell

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    I became reacquainted with TOS when one of the "local" over-the-air stations showed the newly-restored version late at night about ten years ago. A drawback of these showings was that they had to cut a few minutes from each episode in order to make room for the increased number of commercials that TV stations in the US now run, compared to the late 1960s. For the full experience you have to turn to the disc versions (Blu-ray or DVD) or online. Those broadcasts did look a lot better than my faded memories of the originals, and induced me to splurge on the Blu-rays when they came out.

    Paramount then followed with similar treatment for Star Trek: The Next Generation which I never watched during its initial run 1987-94, for some reason. This time I recorded all the episodes off the air, then bought the Blu-rays.
     
  18. Sep 12, 2016 #17

    OCR

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    Dave, I'm not a "radio guy" like you are, so I'm basically ignorant about that realm...
    What are your Free to air channels, and what is the equipment needed to receive them ?

    I looked here, and here ... but, as I said, I'm ignorant ... :blushing:
     
  19. Sep 12, 2016 #18

    davenn

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    I have enjoyed all the various Star Trek variations TOS, Next Gen, the movies etc
    and yes, whilst there have been a few "dud" in there, overall the quality has been good

    These days, yes, we can look back on TOS and say ... wow some of those were real cheesy
    back then they were 'Just the Bees knees" :smile:


    Dave
     
  20. Sep 12, 2016 #19

    davenn

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    just a standard TV set and an antenna (an inside or outside one depending on how close to the transmitter you are)

    Not too many years ago, "free to air" wasn't totally free as everyone used to have to buy a TV licence ( it was a significant source for funding for the various TV channel operators). That was abolished and now ALL their funding comes from advertising and as a result we have the problem that @jtbell commented on ....
    much more advertising is crammed into every hour and programs are edited to fit

    Pay TV here primarily Foxtel, Telstra and Optus and a few other minors that usually piggyback on one of the major carriers anyway
    Pay TV is either via cable or satellite ... I don't subscribe to either ... just too expensive


    Dave
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2016
  21. Sep 12, 2016 #20

    OCR

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    Thanks, Dave... :ok:
     
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