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A question about biological molecule's fluorescence

  1. Dec 6, 2005 #1
    many biological molecule can emit fluorescence.
    but is the quantum field of these molecules large?
    can u give me some examples that the molecule emits strong fluorescence,
    such as beta-carotene? for this field ,i know little.
    thank u
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 6, 2005 #2

    Monique

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    An example is green fluorescent protein from Aequorea victoria, used a lot for research purposes.
     
  4. Dec 6, 2005 #3
    are there some molecules that can emit fluorescence in the visible band?
     
  5. Dec 6, 2005 #4

    Monique

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    GFP fluoresces in the lower green portion of the visible spectrum, why exactly do you need to know? p.s. Aequorea victoria is a yelly fish.
     
  6. Dec 6, 2005 #5

    Moonbear

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    For something like GFP, you can find articles in the types of journals that publish new techniques that report the absorption and emission spectra for those compounds. Similar information should also be available for something like beta-carotene, but it's likely to be found in much older literature.
     
  7. Dec 6, 2005 #6

    DocToxyn

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    Fluorescence is essentially a reaction to existing light energy, the molecule is excited by visible light or other wavelengths, it resides inthe excited state for a time and then emits some of that energy back out at longer wavelengths. Different molecules excite and emit with different characteristics. The green fluorescent protein mentioned in previous posts is only one of many biologically and synthetically produced compounds that are used in science to monitor numerous cellular and subcellular endpoints such as presence of surface markers, reporter gene activity, pH, calcium concentrations, etc. Some other commonly used fluorophores are phycoerythrin, fluorescein isothiocynate (FITC), PerCP and others. Check the information of a site from a company called Molecular Probes for a catalog of these chemicals used in science and their applications/references
    This process differs from chemiluminescence that generates it's own light via chemical reactions. Fireflies and deep sea organisms are good examples of applications of this process.
     
  8. Dec 7, 2005 #7
    because a experiment need that
     
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