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I A question about non-conductive materials

  1. Apr 5, 2016 #1
    We are trying to come up with a frame for a drone (4' in diameter) that could withstand the pressure and high winds of a super cell. I can't say much more on it at the moment until the project is complete but I would like to know if there are any non-conductive materials that could withstand that much pressure. Is this something that might be possible given a good frame design?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 5, 2016 #2
    ceramics/glass or polymers can be chosen like teflon - but if one goes for glass /unbreakable glass sheets i think it will be cheaper also .
     
  4. Apr 6, 2016 #3
    Thank you for your reply. It would be very interesting to be able to use ceramics for what I'm going for. If it could be done that would be great. I'm trying to build an impact resistant frame for a drone. The design would be a gyro sphere style with a 360° camera in the center. The sphere would have the propellers positioned on the outside of the frame and the box for the camera would have a Kevlar coating. The design would have to be able to withstand high winds and impacts and should at least be able to be somewhat maneuvered in said conditions. Is this something that is possible? Also if I did use ceramics, would I be able to mold that into a hollow tubing for the frame? Again thank you for your consideration and any help you might be able to give me. :smile:
     
  5. Apr 6, 2016 #4

    Drakkith

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    How big is this drone?
     
  6. Apr 6, 2016 #5

    davenn

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    withstanding the high winds and being knocked out of the sky into the ground and still useable is one thing

    still being able to fly very close to/within a supercell is a whole different ball game and probably almost impossible
    consider the conditions similar to being in a front loading clothes washing machine. I couldn't imagine anyone
    being able to maintain flight control of it as it was being flipped and spun all over the place and being smashed with
    5cm and greater hailstones. And you have the added risk of lightning strikes and if not a direct strike it is going to be
    subjected to some very high electric fields that could do serious electronics damage

    he said 4' diameter


    Dave
     
  7. Apr 6, 2016 #6

    Drakkith

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    So he did. My mistake.
     
  8. Apr 6, 2016 #7

    davenn

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    no probs I miss the info on a regular basis ... an ol' fart going blind syndrome haha
     
  9. Apr 6, 2016 #8

    Drakkith

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    But what's my excuse!? o_O
     
  10. Apr 7, 2016 #9

    ProfuselyQuarky

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    2016 Award

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