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Absolute time, local time, planck time

  1. Mar 15, 2014 #1
    While Planck time is usually regarded as the shortest unit of time, isn't the shortest unit of time that can exist is the time it took to go from absolute time, the big bang, to everything after that i.e. local time? Did local time exist at the instant of the Big Bang?
     
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  3. Mar 15, 2014 #2

    mfb

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    What do you mean with "absolute time" and "local time"?
    And how is that related to the shortest meaningful unit of time today?
     
  4. Mar 15, 2014 #3

    Vanadium 50

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    It's not, which means the whole rest of the question follows from a faulty premise.
     
  5. Mar 17, 2014 #4
    In some sources like Wikipedia, Planck's time is regarded as the shortest unit of time.
     
  6. Mar 17, 2014 #5
    If we assume that the Big Bang was absolute time was Planck's epoch the start of local time i.e. dependent upon the observer?
     
  7. Mar 17, 2014 #6

    mfb

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    It is the shortest time interval where our current physics could be valid. We don't know what happens at shorter time intervals.

    That question just does not make sense.
     
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