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AC Circuits - peak to peak voltage

  • Thread starter pyroknife
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  • #1
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Let's say you have a sine wave V=2sin(2t) V. For this peak to peak voltage is 4V.
Then let's say that everything below V=0 is cut off.
Is the peak to peak value for this just from 0 to 2V? Making Vpp=2V?
 

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  • #2
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yeppp
 
  • #3
rude man
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Let's say you have a sine wave V=2sin(2t) V. For this peak to peak voltage is 4V.
Then let's say that everything below V=0 is cut off.
Is the peak to peak value for this just from 0 to 2V? Making Vpp=2V?
Yes, but it's not equivalent to a sine wave with 2V pk-pk = sin(2t). Not even if it's biased upwards so that V = 1 + sin(2t).
 
  • #4
747
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You are correct. pk-pk is exactly what it says, the difference between the maximum and minimum voltage. The v = 2sin(2t) signal cut off below 0 would have a pk-pk of 2 volts, but the rms voltage of this signal would be different from the rms voltage of the v =- sin(2t) signal. The rms voltage I am speaking of is the "root mean square" of tghe signal and is the effective power of the signal.
 

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