Acceleration on an inclined plane

In summary, the conversation discusses a scenario where a box is placed on an inclined plane and the forces are broken into components. It is questioned whether, if the X and Y axis' are kept in their usual positions, the acceleration in the Y direction would be 0 if the box is sliding up or down the plane. The answer depends on whether the box is moving at a constant velocity.
  • #1
Jacob87411
171
1
This is more a general case question than a specific problem. Say you have a box on an inclined plane and you break the forces into the components, sum the forces in Y and X. If you keep your X and Y axis' the way they usually are (don't make the X axis along the inclined plane) and the box is sliding up or down the plane is your acceleration in the Y 0, thus making the sum of your forces in the Y direction 0? Thanks
 
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  • #2
Jacob87411 said:
This is more a general case question than a specific problem. Say you have a box on an inclined plane and you break the forces into the components, sum the forces in Y and X. If you keep your X and Y axis' the way they usually are (don't make the X axis along the inclined plane) and the box is sliding up or down the plane is your acceleration in the Y 0, thus making the sum of your forces in the Y direction 0? Thanks
That depends whether your moving at a constant velocity or not :rolleyes:
 
  • #3


Yes, as long as the box is not moving in the Y direction, the acceleration in the Y direction will be 0. This is because the sum of the forces in the Y direction, also known as the net force, is equal to the mass of the box multiplied by its acceleration in the Y direction (Newton's second law). If the net force is 0, then the acceleration in the Y direction must also be 0. This means that the box is not accelerating up or down the plane, and is either at rest or moving at a constant velocity in the Y direction.
 

Related to Acceleration on an inclined plane

1. What is acceleration on an inclined plane?

Acceleration on an inclined plane is the rate at which the velocity of an object changes as it moves along an inclined surface. It is a measure of how quickly an object is speeding up or slowing down on the slope.

2. How is acceleration calculated on an inclined plane?

Acceleration on an inclined plane is calculated using the formula a = gsinθ, where a is the acceleration, g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2), and θ is the angle of the incline.

3. Does the mass of the object affect acceleration on an inclined plane?

Yes, the mass of the object does affect acceleration on an inclined plane. According to Newton's Second Law, the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. Therefore, a heavier object will have a slower acceleration compared to a lighter object on the same inclined plane.

4. What is the difference between acceleration on a horizontal surface and on an inclined plane?

Acceleration on a horizontal surface is constant and equal to the net force divided by the mass of the object, while acceleration on an inclined plane is affected by the angle of the incline and the force of gravity acting on the object. This means that on an inclined plane, the acceleration can vary depending on the angle of the slope.

5. How does friction affect acceleration on an inclined plane?

Friction on an inclined plane acts in the opposite direction of the object's motion, causing it to slow down. This can decrease the acceleration of the object and may even cause it to come to a stop. However, if the object is able to overcome the frictional force, it will continue to accelerate down the slope.

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