Advanced Project - Wheatstone Bridge for TCR measurements

In summary, the student is struggling to find information about how to do a Wheatstone Bridge experiment, and is looking for help.
  • #1
Pleonut
2
0
Advanced Project -- Wheatstone Bridge for TCR measurements

Ok, so I have to do this experiment on my own as part of my coursework this year and I picked something called the temperature coefficient of resistance.

I think I basically have to determine the TCR or copper and I'm almost certain that I need to use a Wheatstone bridge. The theory behind the experiment makes sense to me I guess, but I'm not very good at the practical stuff and I'm not really sure what apparatus I need for it. I have to prove the formula:-Rt = Ro (1 + alpha(t) ) if that helps at all.

Unfortunately, the only book my school has with any information about my experiment isn't in the library at the moment and I'm really struggling to find a version online that uses a Wheatstone bridge.

If anyone has done this experiment before or has any ideas on how I might set it up, I could really use the help :/
 
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  • #2
Pleonut said:
Ok, so I have to do this experiment on my own as part of my coursework this year and I picked something called the temperature coefficient of resistance.

I think I basically have to determine the TCR or copper and I'm almost certain that I need to use a Wheatstone bridge. The theory behind the experiment makes sense to me I guess, but I'm not very good at the practical stuff and I'm not really sure what apparatus I need for it. I have to prove the formula:-Rt = Ro (1 + alpha(t) ) if that helps at all.

Unfortunately, the only book my school has with any information about my experiment isn't in the library at the moment and I'm really struggling to find a version online that uses a Wheatstone bridge.

If anyone has done this experiment before or has any ideas on how I might set it up, I could really use the help :/

I googled Wheatstone Bridge for Resistance Measurements, which got me to the wikipedia page for Wheatstone Bridge.

On that page, the variation of the bridge best suited for measuring small resistances is the Carey Foster bridge:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carey_Foster_bridge

That article should help you get going with your project. :smile:
 
  • #3
Thanks, broski.

Although I decided to man up and just tell my teacher I was confused and he said he'd give me a hand tomorrow.

But cheers for the link (Even though it's that Wikipedia bollocks).
 
Last edited:

Related to Advanced Project - Wheatstone Bridge for TCR measurements

1. What is a Wheatstone Bridge and how does it work?

A Wheatstone Bridge is a circuit used to measure the resistance of a component, specifically the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) in this case. It consists of four resistors arranged in a diamond pattern, with a voltage source connected to the two opposite ends and a voltmeter connected to the other two ends. By comparing the voltage readings, the unknown resistance can be calculated using the known resistances and Ohm's Law.

2. Why is a Wheatstone Bridge used for TCR measurements?

A Wheatstone Bridge is used for TCR measurements because it provides a highly accurate and precise way to measure resistance. It is also able to compensate for changes in temperature, ensuring that the TCR is accurately measured.

3. What are the key components of a Wheatstone Bridge circuit?

The key components of a Wheatstone Bridge circuit are four resistors, a voltage source, and a voltmeter. The resistors are arranged in a diamond pattern, with two connected in series and two connected in parallel. The voltage source and voltmeter are connected to the opposite ends of the diamond pattern.

4. How is the TCR calculated using a Wheatstone Bridge?

The TCR is calculated using the formula TCR = (R2-R1) / (R1 x ΔT), where R1 and R2 are the known resistances and ΔT is the change in temperature. By comparing the voltage readings from the Wheatstone Bridge, R1 and R2 can be determined and plugged into the formula to calculate the TCR.

5. What are some common applications of Wheatstone Bridge circuits?

Wheatstone Bridge circuits have a variety of applications, including measurement of resistance, temperature, and strain. They are commonly used in scientific experiments, industrial settings, and electronic devices such as thermometers and strain gauges.

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