Aerospace/Applied Physics for building robotic exploration vehicles

In summary, if you want to work on robotics projects in a research capacity, get a degree in engineering or physics. And if you want to work on robotic projects as a contractor for a defense company, get a degree from a US university.
  • #1
razidan
75
1
Hello everyone,
I was wondering what degree/s do the people that build all the robotic exploration vehicles have.
I have a bachelor's in physics and a bachelor's in material engineering from a university outside the US.
I have now moved to the US and I would like to continue my education, I was thinking Aerospace eng or applied physics.
I would like to end up working on research robotic missions...

I know most of the robotic vehicles are assembled at JPL but usually have a defense contractor (lockheed, Boeing, Northropp) working on them also.. so what job description involves working on one of these?
Do i need to work at JPL or at one of the defense companies?Thanks,
R
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
razidan said:
Hello everyone,
I was wondering what degree/s do the people that build all the robotic exploration vehicles have.
I have a bachelor's in physics and a bachelor's in material engineering from a university outside the US.
I have now moved to the US and I would like to continue my education, I was thinking Aerospace eng or applied physics.
I would like to end up working on research robotic missions...

I know most of the robotic vehicles are assembled at JPL but usually have a defense contractor (lockheed, Boeing, Northropp) working on them also.. so what job description involves working on one of these?
Do i need to work at JPL or at one of the defense companies?Thanks,
R
Hey Razidan,

Personally I've dream't of working at JPL and other branches of NASA as a kid hahaha; anyways, I believe the defence companies generally handle hardware components - system integration for the robotic vehicles etc are generally done within NASA (like at the JPL). If you would like to see the entire system come to fruition, you should probably be aiming for JPL :)

Oh, and looking at your qualifications, you're headed in the right direction with engineering degrees - and such a field does not have a strict education background requirement (unless of course, they are needing and hiring only specific specialists in very specific fields).
 
  • #3
The guys I've known in that game were all mechanical engineers.
 
  • #4
Mechanical engineering. Try to work on projects that involve robotics, autonomous vehicles, etc. And in case you aren't (I can't tell from your message), get your US citizenship. Many of these positions are likely to require it.
 
  • #5
Thanks for the responses everyone.
 

Related to Aerospace/Applied Physics for building robotic exploration vehicles

1. What is aerospace/applied physics?

Aerospace/applied physics is a branch of science that combines principles of physics and engineering to study the behavior of objects in motion, particularly in the Earth's atmosphere and outer space. It involves the design, development, and operation of vehicles and systems used for space exploration and other aerospace applications.

2. How is aerospace/applied physics used in building robotic exploration vehicles?

Aerospace/applied physics plays a crucial role in the design and development of robotic exploration vehicles. It helps engineers understand the physical laws that govern the movement and behavior of these vehicles in various environments, such as space or other planets. This knowledge is used to create efficient and reliable systems that can withstand the extreme conditions of space and successfully carry out their intended missions.

3. What are some key concepts in aerospace/applied physics for building robotic exploration vehicles?

Some key concepts in aerospace/applied physics for building robotic exploration vehicles include propulsion, aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and materials science. These concepts are essential in designing propulsion systems, understanding the effects of air resistance on the vehicle, managing heat generated during operation, and selecting materials that can withstand the harsh conditions of space.

4. What are the challenges of using aerospace/applied physics in building robotic exploration vehicles?

One of the main challenges of using aerospace/applied physics in building robotic exploration vehicles is the complexity of the systems involved. These vehicles must be designed to operate in extreme environments with limited human intervention, which requires a thorough understanding of various physical principles. Additionally, the cost and time required for research and development can also be a challenge in building these vehicles.

5. How does aerospace/applied physics contribute to the advancement of space exploration?

Aerospace/applied physics is crucial in the advancement of space exploration as it allows us to design and build vehicles that can travel further, faster, and more efficiently. It also helps us understand the physical properties of different planets and celestial bodies, which is essential in planning and executing successful space missions. Furthermore, advancements in aerospace/applied physics can lead to innovations in other fields, such as transportation and energy production.

Similar threads

  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
19
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
10
Views
874
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
27
Views
3K
Replies
18
Views
4K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
33
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
17
Views
3K
Back
Top