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Aerospace Engineering job roles?

  1. Sep 4, 2017 #26

    Dr Transport

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    If the OP works for Boeing, the chances that anything they work on will be used for military purposes is pretty high. If they don't like the paycheck, they are more than welcome to leave and find another employer.

    Working in aerospace in the US has nearly a 100% chance it will be converted or used in some way shape or form for military use.
     
  2. Sep 4, 2017 #27

    FactChecker

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    I can see modifications of commercial planes for cargo and tanker use, but I can't imagine it for anything that has very demanding military-only requirements. The tanker requirements will probably begin to include stealth that will not allow conversions of commercial planes. Not sure about cargo. There is too much requirement these days for speed, stealth, maneuverability, survivability, carrier operations, short runways, etc. that would force a new design.

    If the OP wants his efforts to not be usable by the military, then he has a problem with almost anything he does. Because of the unique military airplane requirements, airplanes may be one of the better choices.
     
  3. Sep 5, 2017 #28
    Thanks for all your replies. Do you's think its a bad idea to do an aero eng undergrad degree in uni even though I prob won't be an aerospace engineer? because here in the UK the aero and mech eng programmes have exactly the same core modules as each other and the 'applied' modules for aero are based on air & spacecraft, and for mech they're just applied to machinery in general. So the two programmes are very similar so some employers don't see a distinction. I know learning aerodynamics, propulsion etc can be useful in areas other than aero, so what do you guys think?
     
  4. Sep 5, 2017 #29

    FactChecker

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    I would recommend getting the degree that best matches your job goal.
     
  5. Sep 5, 2017 #30
    I am aware of only one case were an aerospace engineer got put into a different field (There is bound to be plenty more). He focused his consecration around heat dissipation surfaces and thermodynamics. He now works on cooling systems for Caterpillar. Yeah, there is a fair bit of overlapping between ME and AE but as @FactChecker said, get a degree in what you want to do. Even if you end up not doing AE you can still study it out of interest, no one is going to come to your house and take all you books from you. :smile:

    Only other option is to start your own AE company and keep all your IP private.
     
  6. Sep 5, 2017 #31
    The only other organisation I can think of that is not government funded and has not sold any of its IP to the Defence sector is Bigelow Aerospace, but that doesn't mean they won't. Then again its an American company so getting an ITAR certification is very hard and even then you might be restricted, so companies don't bother with it unless you're an expert in some critical field.

    Edit: I think they are also heavily affiliated with NASA so I am sceptical of how there projects are actually funded.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 5, 2017
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