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Analysis , then PDE ?

  1. Dec 9, 2008 #1
    Is Advanced calculus absolutely necessary in order to succeed in PDE ?
    The problem is that my school does not require me to take Adv Calculus since i am an applied math major , i am not even required to take a proof based course here's the link for the major ( http://w3.fiu.edu/math/html/urmath.htm ),
    but i took intro to proofs anyways , i just finished it, the course included several proof methods, induction, strong induction, infinite sets, and then the first 2 chapters of Adv. Calculus, i covered : sequences , including cauchy sequences , and limits, using delta epsilon proofs.
    after intro to proofs follows Adv. Calculus which begans with the 3rd chapter
    Here is the description for MAP4401 ( PDE) http://w3.fiu.edu/math/html/ucourses.htm#MAP4401
    Do you guys think this is enough ?
    You probably say , take analysis , but here is the problem

    1) taking analysis would delay my graduation by 1 year( since this is only offered once a year
    2) i am not required to take it , but another professor told me that " having a knowledge of advanced calculus would help " by that he meant the whole course in adv. calculus or the stuff i covered in my intro to proofs class

    i would like to hear your thoughts
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2008 #2


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    Depends on what you mean by succeeding. Do you just want to know how to solve some basic PDEs or do you want to go to grad school?

    I think the most obvious answer is that your school's graduate PDE class requires the undergraduate advanced calculus class.
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