Applying Computational Physics to Car/Bicycle Accidents

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  • Thread starter jedishrfu
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One tactic that is useful to the cyclist comes from water navigation. Boaters know that if the other vessel is on a constant bearing, you are on a collision course. When you watch the simulation, note that the angle between the cyclist's road and the pillar shadow is approximately constant.

As a cyclist, I use this when approaching an intersection. Not only do I note whether I'm in the driver's blind spot from the A pillar, but I note the angle at which I'm viewing the intersecting vehicle. You can easily train yourself to notice when the angle doesn't change; to me, this makes alarm bells go off in my mind. It's a great survival tactic.
 
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anorlunda
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As a cyclist, I use this when approaching an intersection. Not only do I note whether I'm in the driver's blind spot from the A pillar, but I note the angle at which I'm viewing the intersecting vehicle. You can easily train yourself to notice when the angle doesn't change; to me, this makes alarm bells go off in my mind. It's a great survival tactic.
That should work quite well as long as the corner is not "blind". It takes a bit of practice to become proficient at it. All that's needed is a way to educate the cycling public.
 

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