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Are clock radios particularly frangible?

  1. Jan 22, 2016 #1

    DaveC426913

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    The two clock radios in our bedroom both kaffed it recently. It is entirely possible that they both kaffed it at the same time. I did not notice.

    At first, I thought maybe the clock radios had simply been drained of power too long - when I deliberately had that circuit off for an extended duration - and that had caused them to .. I dunno... fail-to-thrive? (Do clock radios need companionship? Has anyone heard of a clock radio pulling all its feathers out?)

    I have been working on the electrical system in my bedroom over the month as part of a reno, and once, I shorted a line with a pair of wire strippers, popping a breaker. There were other things on that same breaker, including several lights, my TV and the cable box, none of which suffered any ill effects.
     
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  3. Jan 22, 2016 #2

    Borg

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    Maybe the radios were too fragile to handle the short?
     
  4. Jan 22, 2016 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Yes, that's the first, most obvious conclusion. I guess the other devices just happened to not fry.

    Would a short in a line running off the same breaker but not directly attached to the radios cause a surge?
     
  5. Jan 22, 2016 #4

    Borg

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    I guess that would depend on whether they were in series or parallel. Is it possible that all of the appliances had ground plugs but the radios didn't?
     
  6. Jan 22, 2016 #5

    DaveC426913

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    That is possible. The radios are definitely 2 prong, whereas the TV is 3 prong. But the cable box is 2 prong as well, though it has a wall-wart (transformer).

    Not sure how they could be in series. They're plugged into an an outlet. The TV, cable box and one radio are both on a 3-prong extension cord from the outlet. The other radio is directly from the outlet.
     
  7. Jan 22, 2016 #6

    Borg

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    The transformer would tend to protect slightly on a surge. You might want to open the radios. They sometimes have a simple fuse that you can replace.
     
  8. Jan 22, 2016 #7

    DaveC426913

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    Oh. Right. Thanks. I'll check that out before replacing them.

    I always forget the obvious stuff. :sorry:
     
  9. Jan 22, 2016 #8

    Borg

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    So do I - even for stuff that I work with daily. :confused:
     
  10. Jan 22, 2016 #9

    DaveC426913

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    Well poop. 110V is wired directly to the transformer.

    And it sure looks like nothing was supposed to be accessed easily. I'd have to disassemble most of the mechanical components and controls to get at anything - including the transformer.
     
  11. Jan 23, 2016 #10

    meBigGuy

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    Shorting the line would cause transients when the breaker opened that can blow things out. Many devices have surge protectors. I guess your radios didn't.
     
  12. Jan 23, 2016 #11

    DaveC426913

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    I wonder if that's what's wrong with the dining room fan as well. Hasn't worked since I started this.
    It's got a wireless remote (not sure what broadcast method it uses). I hope it's just a fuse and not the electronics...
     
  13. Jan 24, 2016 #12

    anorlunda

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    An intermediate arcing fault (or arcing open circuit) in your house can generate surges. Some electronic gadgets are overly vulnerable to that.

    Of course, an arcing fault implies an incipient fire, so pay attention and search for it. Also be on the alert for any light flicker, even a single flick.
     
  14. Jan 24, 2016 #13

    DaveC426913

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    Would that be related to the big blue flash in my face, followed by a whole bunch of pitch black, when I cut into the 18/2 wire with my wire strippers? :woot:
     
  15. Jan 25, 2016 #14
    Would it be safe to guess that the place they were manufactured was China?
     
  16. Jan 31, 2016 #15
    18-2?!?

    Your clock radios were on a fire alarm circuit???
     
  17. Jan 31, 2016 #16

    DaveC426913

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    Sorry, more like 14/2.
     
  18. Feb 5, 2016 #17
    I think is is safe to assume that clock radios are very sensitive. They have been abused from the start of their lives. Yelled and cursed at for doing their job. Slapped around and knocked from their resting place. It is not at all surprising that they would just give up and die.

    I repair electronic things and they often confide in me the nature of their abuse. Sad really.......

    Sorry for being such a joker...lol

    Billy
     
  19. Feb 6, 2016 #18

    Borg

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  20. Feb 6, 2016 #19

    DaveC426913

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    Clock radios are people too.
     
  21. Feb 6, 2016 #20
    Thanks Borg,

    What a collection of electrical stuff !! Very nice photos. I may ask Don if I can put one or two on my web site.

    OH...BTW..please try to be kind to the clock radios...lol

    Cheers,

    Billy
     
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