Are Volcanic Emissions Really Greater Than Man-Made Greenhouse Gases?

In summary, there is more greenhouse gas released from a single volcanic eruption than all of the gasses produced by man since the industrial revolution. However, this does not mean that the global warming issue is invalid.
  • #1
OSalcido
66
0
is it true that there are more greenhouse gasses released from a single Volcanic eruption than all of the gasses produced by man since the industrial revolution?

If so, shouldn't that silence the global-warming advocates?
 
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  • #2
No, hence, no.
 
  • #3
Any references would be appreciated
 
  • #5
Probably not from a single eruption, but combined volcanoes do pump out more greenhouse gases than people. Umm, i can't really talk about global warming and atmosphere stuff cos it's not really my thing. But I believe that volcanoes pump out sulphate aerosoles, these things cool the Earth down - I guess they increase the planet's albedo.
 
  • #6
OSalcido said:
Any references would be appreciated

Volcanic emissions of CO2 are approximately 1% that of anthropogenic emissions.

http://www.bgs.ac.uk/programmes/landres/segs/downloads/VolcanicContributions.pdf

That is another common denialist talking point that has been thoroughy debunked years ago.
 
  • #7
Skyhunter said:
Volcanic emissions of CO2 are approximately 1% that of anthropogenic emissions.

http://www.bgs.ac.uk/programmes/landres/segs/downloads/VolcanicContributions.pdf

That is another common denialist talking point that has been thoroughy debunked years ago.

And that's a strawman. There is no serious debate about the origine of the CO2. The volcangenetic CO2 is completely irrelevant. The essential problem with a strong GHG effect is the triple falsification of the positive feedback idea which is the key mechanism to catastrophic global warming.
 
  • #8
The recent "Global Warming Swindle" documentary for example made the claim that volcanoes emit more CO2 than man, and I have had plenty of arguments with people claiming that there is debate about the origin of the co2. Clearly it's not a strawman to say that it's a common argument used by skeptics.
 
  • #9
true lies and half truth

over total history I think the volcano's win
as they have been around a lot longer then man
but billions or even millions of years ago old CO2
is long gone and plays no part in the current events

but over a given year no
maybe higher at peak in a real intence event
for a short period of time?
data sure is being SPUN
by both sides
 
  • #10
ray b said:
true lies and half truth

over total history I think the volcano's win
as they have been around a lot longer then man
but billions or even millions of years ago old CO2
is long gone and plays no part in the current events

but over a given year no
maybe higher at peak in a real intence event
for a short period of time?
data sure is being SPUN
by both sides

Of course there will be false arguments from some individuals on both sides, but the wholesale falsification of data is overwhelmingly on one side. Answers to most "skeptic" arguments are well known and can be found here, among many other places.
http://gristmill.grist.org/skeptics

There's a much more wordy description of skeptic arguments here; it's a year old but doubt about AGW has only decreased since it was written. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/23/AR2006052301305_pf.html
 

1. What is the role of volcanoes in producing greenhouse gases?

Volcanoes release greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and water vapor during eruptions. These gases contribute to the Earth's natural greenhouse effect, trapping heat and warming the planet. However, the amount of greenhouse gases emitted by volcanoes is relatively small compared to human activities such as burning fossil fuels.

2. How do volcanic emissions of greenhouse gases compare to other sources?

In terms of total emissions, human activities such as burning fossil fuels and deforestation produce significantly more greenhouse gases than volcanic eruptions. However, volcanic emissions can have a localized impact on air quality and climate in the immediate area of the eruption.

3. Can volcanic eruptions contribute to climate change?

While volcanic eruptions do release greenhouse gases, their impact on global climate change is relatively minor. The largest volcanic eruptions in history have only caused a temporary cooling effect on the Earth's climate, and the long-term trend of increasing global temperatures is primarily driven by human activities.

4. Are all types of volcanoes equally significant in producing greenhouse gases?

The amount and type of greenhouse gases emitted by a volcano depend on several factors, including the composition of the magma, the type of eruption, and the location of the volcano. For example, volcanoes in areas with high levels of sulfur in the magma can release significant amounts of sulfur dioxide, which can have a larger impact on climate than carbon dioxide.

5. How do scientists study and monitor volcanic emissions of greenhouse gases?

Scientists use a variety of methods to study and monitor volcanic emissions of greenhouse gases, including gas sensors, satellite imagery, and ground-based measurements. These techniques can help determine the types and amounts of gases being released, as well as the potential impact on the environment and climate.

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