Axisymmetric radiative transfer

In summary: Your Name]In summary, the speaker is currently working on a thermal radiation modelling project for their PhD studies. They are trying to develop a cylindrical symmetric thermal radiation solver code to solve the thermal radiation field in an absorbing medium between concentric cylinders. However, their current code has a bug and is producing unexpected results. The speaker is seeking advice and suggestions from others in the field and is considering using open-source software to help with their project.
  • #1
hilbert2
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Hi,

I'm currently working on thermal radiation modelling in my PhD studies, and one thing that's under work is a cylindrical symmetric thermal radiation solver code. The idea is to solve the thermal radiation field in an absorbing medium between concentric cylinders as an essentially 1D problem using the axisymmetry, so that you can use a smaller computational grid than when calculating an explicitly 2D field.

The code we currently have could solve an axisymmetric problem in principle, but there seems to be some kind of a bug in it at the moment and it gives some strange results.

Have any of you, by chance, seen any public domain codes that are meant to solve axisymmetric radiation fields for neutron radiation (in nuclear reactors), acoustic emission, or something else that obeys radiative transfer equations similar to those of thermal radiation? I guess neutron radiation fields behave pretty much similarly to photon radiation despite the finite half life of a neutron. Nuclear engineering is probably a field where there's little room for mistakes, so I think I could pretty confidently look at a neutron radiation code as an example of how to solve the cylindrical problem.

-hilbert2
 
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  • #2


Hello hilbert2,

Thank you for sharing your current project and the challenges you are facing. I am not familiar with any specific public domain codes for solving axisymmetric radiation fields for neutron radiation, but I do have some general advice that may help with your current code.

First, I would recommend thoroughly reviewing your code to identify any potential bugs or errors. This could involve double-checking your equations and boundary conditions, as well as testing the code with different inputs and comparing the results to expected values.

If you are unable to identify and fix the bug in your current code, you may want to consider reaching out to other researchers in your field for assistance. They may have experience with similar problems and may be able to offer insights or suggestions for solving the issue.

Additionally, you could also look into using open-source software such as OpenFOAM or FEniCS, which have capabilities for solving thermal radiation problems in axisymmetric geometries. These software packages have a large user community and resources available for support and troubleshooting.

I wish you the best of luck with your project and hope you are able to resolve the issue with your code. Keep persevering and don't hesitate to reach out for help when needed.
 

Related to Axisymmetric radiative transfer

1. What is axisymmetric radiative transfer?

Axisymmetric radiative transfer is a mathematical model used to describe the transfer of radiation in a medium that has symmetry around a central axis. This model is commonly used in astrophysics and atmospheric science to study the transport of energy and radiation through a medium, such as a planet's atmosphere or a star's interior.

2. How does axisymmetric radiative transfer differ from other radiative transfer models?

Unlike other radiative transfer models, axisymmetric radiative transfer assumes that the medium being studied has symmetry around a central axis. This allows for simplification of the mathematical equations and makes it easier to model the transfer of radiation in complex systems, such as a rotating planet or a star with a strong magnetic field.

3. What are the applications of axisymmetric radiative transfer?

Axisymmetric radiative transfer is used in various fields of science, including astrophysics, atmospheric science, and plasma physics. It is used to study the energy and radiation transfer in celestial bodies, such as planets, stars, and galaxies, as well as in laboratory settings to simulate conditions found in these bodies.

4. How does axisymmetric radiative transfer impact our understanding of the universe?

Axisymmetric radiative transfer is an important tool in understanding the energy and radiation transport in various celestial bodies. By using this model, scientists can better understand the processes that occur in stars, planets, and other astronomical objects, which can ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of the universe and its origins.

5. What are the challenges of using axisymmetric radiative transfer?

One of the main challenges of using axisymmetric radiative transfer is accurately representing the complex and dynamic nature of the studied systems. This requires careful parameterization and consideration of various factors, such as temperature, composition, and external influences. Additionally, the computational complexity of the model can also pose challenges in terms of time and resource requirements.

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