Batteries and Radiation: Exploring the Kinetic and Electromagnetic Theories

In summary, because an ion is just a charge with a certain amount of KE, and because movement of the ion is slow, an ionic battery doesn't give off a significant amount of EM radiation and lose its charge quickly.
  • #1
4
0
Why don't batteries give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation and lose their charge quickly? I was thinking about kinetic theory and electromagnetic theory, and it seems that the ions in the battery ought to be accelerating quite a bit since they are in constant motion and bumping into walls and other particles (changing speed and direction). Why don't these ions give off their charge when they accelerate? Shouldn't this cause the battery to lose its charge rather quickly? :shy:
 
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
As long as the + and - are insulated from each other, there is no way or the charge to change. Motion itself doesn't have the effect your describing.
 
  • #3
reeckstar said:
Why don't batteries give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation and lose their charge quickly? I was thinking about kinetic theory and electromagnetic theory, and it seems that the ions in the battery ought to be accelerating quite a bit since they are in constant motion and bumping into walls and other particles (changing speed and direction). Why don't these ions give off their charge when they accelerate? Shouldn't this cause the battery to lose its charge rather quickly? :shy:

Without entering into the subject of charge movement in a battery:

Electromagnetic radiation has no electric charge, and therefore doesn't transport electric charge away from a radiating charge.
 
  • #4
Thanks for clearing that up, mathman and torquil. What about the first part of the question? Why don't they give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation (accelerating ions give off electromagnetic radiation, right?)?
 
  • #5
Have you thought about exactly what an ion is??
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ion

ions in the battery ought to be accelerating quite a bit since they are in constant motion and bumping into walls and other particles (changing speed and direction).

Ion movement is actually rather slow.

Does an atom of any material "...give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation and lose ...(any) charge quickly?

How about an ion anywhere?

Why don't they keys on your computer keyboard emit radiation when you tap them??

And how about current in a battery circuit: why doesn't it "..give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation and lose ...charge quickly?..." Remember the power loss here is a simple I2R.
 
  • #6
Naty1 said:
Ion movement is actually rather slow.

Why don't they keys on your computer keyboard emit radiation when you tap them??

And how about current in a battery circuit: why doesn't iy "..give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation and lose ...charge quickly?..." Remember the power loss here is a simple I2R.

I thought a current does give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation?

Also, what do you mean by ions moving slow? Aren't they just as fast as any other atom, just charged?
 
Last edited:
  • #7
From what has already been said, let me clarify and change the question:

Why don't batteries give off a significant amount of electromagnetic radiation (from the acceleration of ions--implication of electromagnetic theory and kinetic theory) and then change state due to the loss of energy (when I say change state the subject is the ionic liquid/gel)?
 
  • #8
I suppose an ion, when changing dirrection, would give off a bit of EM radiation. The source of the energy would be the KE of the ion. It would likely get absorbed by another atom in the battery and so be just a means of heat movement. If it escaped the battery and caused the average temperature of the battery to drop by a tiny fraction of a degree the battery would simply absorb a tiny amount of heat from its environment and stay the same temperature as the environment.
 

1. What is a battery and how does it work?

A battery is a device that converts chemical energy into electrical energy. It is composed of two electrodes, a positive and a negative, and an electrolyte solution. When a circuit is connected to the battery, a chemical reaction occurs between the electrodes, producing a flow of electrons from the negative electrode to the positive electrode, creating an electrical current.

2. What is radiation and how does it relate to batteries?

Radiation is the emission of energy in the form of electromagnetic waves or particles. In batteries, radiation is not directly involved in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. However, the flow of electrons in a battery produces an electromagnetic field, which can be detected as radiation.

3. How do the kinetic and electromagnetic theories explain the functioning of batteries?

The kinetic theory explains the chemical reactions that occur within a battery, while the electromagnetic theory explains the flow of electrons and the resulting electrical current. Together, these theories provide a comprehensive understanding of how batteries work.

4. Are batteries safe to use, considering the potential for radiation?

Batteries are generally considered safe to use. The amount of radiation emitted from a battery is minimal and not harmful to humans. However, it is important to dispose of batteries properly to avoid any potential environmental hazards.

5. Can batteries be used as a source of radiation for medical or scientific purposes?

Yes, some batteries, such as radioactive batteries, can be used as a source of radiation for medical or scientific purposes. However, these batteries are specially designed and not commonly used in everyday devices. It is important to handle these batteries with caution and follow proper safety protocols.

Suggested for: Batteries and Radiation: Exploring the Kinetic and Electromagnetic Theories

Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
45
Views
3K
Replies
14
Views
941
Replies
21
Views
2K
Replies
31
Views
2K
Replies
18
Views
1K
Replies
49
Views
6K
Replies
58
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
764
Back
Top