Behavioural characteristics of Titanium & Graphite

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential friction and wear between titanium and graphite in a high temperature environment. It is noted that graphite requires small amounts of water to maintain lubricity and can become abrasive in very dry environments. There is speculation that the interaction between titanium and graphite at high temperatures may cause wear due to damage to the TiO2 layer and potential reactions between the two materials. The performance of this combination is dependent on various factors such as speed, load, and atmosphere composition.
  • #1
AB_type_S
1
1
Hi all,

Does anybody have any experience with titanium and graphite in terms of friction and wear over time in a relatively high temperature environment?
I realize that galvanic corrosion shouldn't be too much of an issue, but I was wondering from a sort of tribological point of view.
Hope this makes sense
Thanks in advance
 
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  • #2
AB_type_S said:
Hi all,

Does anybody have any experience with titanium and graphite in terms of friction and wear over time in a relatively high temperature environment?
I realize that galvanic corrosion shouldn't be too much of an issue, but I was wondering from a sort of tribological point of view.
Hope this makes sense
Thanks in advance

Graphite depends on having minuscule amounts of water in its environment to maintain its lubricity. In a very dry environment or one hot enough to drive off intercalated water, it becomes quite abrasive. This was first found, IIRC, in WWII when graphite brushes in electric motors flown at then-novel high altitudes ( = very dry air) started chewing into the commutator metal.

Titanium against graphite at high temperatures is likely to wear fairly fast. I speculate the graphite will damage the native TiO2 layer, which will expose underlying Ti to further oxidation and to reaction with the graphite. Ti forms TiC fairly readily at elevated temperatures. There are copper-based high temperature lubricants that might work for you.

The tribological performance of Ti/graphite depends on speeds, loads, etc. as well as temperature and atmosphere composition. If the environment is other than air, my comment is not likely to apply.
 

1. What are the physical properties of Titanium and Graphite?

Titanium is a strong, lightweight metal with a silver color. It has a high melting point of 1668°C and is highly corrosion-resistant. Graphite, on the other hand, is a soft, black material that is a form of carbon. It has a low density and is a good conductor of electricity and heat.

2. How do the behavioural characteristics of Titanium and Graphite differ?

Titanium is a ductile metal, meaning it can be easily formed into different shapes without breaking. It is also highly resistant to fatigue, making it useful for applications that require repeated stress. Graphite, on the other hand, is brittle and can break easily under stress. It is also highly anisotropic, meaning its properties differ depending on the direction in which it is measured.

3. What are the main uses of Titanium and Graphite?

Titanium is commonly used in aerospace, automotive, and medical industries due to its strength, light weight, and corrosion resistance. It is also used in the production of sports equipment and jewelry. Graphite is used in a variety of industries, including electronics, aerospace, and construction. It is commonly used in pencils, as well as in the production of electrodes and lubricants.

4. How do the behavioural characteristics of Titanium and Graphite make them suitable for different applications?

The high strength and corrosion resistance of titanium make it ideal for use in environments where it may be exposed to harsh conditions. Its ductility also allows it to be formed into various shapes, making it useful for a wide range of applications. The electrical and thermal conductivity of graphite make it suitable for use in electronics and other heat-sensitive applications. Its anisotropic properties also make it useful in reinforcing materials in specific directions.

5. Are there any potential drawbacks to using Titanium and Graphite?

One drawback of titanium is its high cost, making it less accessible for some applications. It is also difficult to weld, which can limit its use in certain industries. Graphite, on the other hand, can be affected by oxidation at high temperatures, reducing its strength and potentially causing it to break. It is also a relatively expensive material.

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