Big Bang & Motion: Origin of Atomic & Subatomic Motion

In summary, the four fundamental forces of the universe - gravitational, electromagnetic, strong nuclear, and weak nuclear - can all be explained by interactions at the molecular level, which are a result of one of these four forces. Some theories suggest that these forces were once unified into one force, but the reason for their separation and existence is still unknown.
  • #1
Naveen345
19
0
Is all motion basically the result of big bang, including atomic and sub-atomic motion?
 
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  • #2
That depends on what your view on the Big Bang is. If you think it is the creation of everything in the universe, then I guess you could say that the big bang is the "source" of all motion. However your question is ill-posed. It's like asking if the Sun is the source of all flavor since it is the source of energy for all life on Earth, and subsequently the food we eat is the result of life.
 
  • #3
Drakkith said:
That depends on what your view on the Big Bang is. If you think it is the creation of everything in the universe, then I guess you could say that the big bang is the "source" of all motion. However your question is ill-posed. It's like asking if the Sun is the source of all flavor since it is the source of energy for all life on Earth, and subsequently the food we eat is the result of life.

I meant that all the four fundamental forces were united previously and then they separated. These basic forces move bodies, sub atomic particles, photons etc. (I am skeptical as to when inertia came into existence, though)
We are also a product of there basic forces. So when we move a thing can we attribute it to the ‘forces’ that made us? I asked the question from this view point.
 
  • #4
All forces can be explained in terms of the four fundamental ones. If you looked closely enough at the surface of our palms when we are pushing an object you'll find that all the motion of the object can be attributed to interactions (of the electromagnetic/nuclear sort) occurring between our hand and the object in question.

In that sense, then yes, every 'force' in the universe can be explained by the summation of millions of interactions occurring at the molecular level, all of which are caused by one of the four fundamental forces. That's why we call them fundamental.
 
  • #5
Vorde said:
All forces can be explained in terms of the four fundamental ones. If you looked closely enough at the surface of our palms when we are pushing an object you'll find that all the motion of the object can be attributed to interactions (of the electromagnetic/nuclear sort) occurring between our hand and the object in question.

In that sense, then yes, every 'force' in the universe can be explained by the summation of millions of interactions occurring at the molecular level, all of which are caused by one of the four fundamental forces. That's why we call them fundamental.

any explanation as to why these four fundamental forces took birth? and why only four and why did they get separated, when they were one initially?
 
  • #6
There are some theories that claim the four forces were once all "Unified" into one force. This just means that at very high energy and density levels the forces and their force carriers are the same. We don't know of any underlying "why" or how they came into existence. I suspect it has something to do with the creation of the universe in its current state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electroweak
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unified_field_theory
 

Related to Big Bang & Motion: Origin of Atomic & Subatomic Motion

1. What is the Big Bang Theory?

The Big Bang Theory is the most widely accepted scientific explanation for the origin of the universe. It states that approximately 13.8 billion years ago, all matter and energy in the universe was concentrated into a single point, known as a singularity. This singularity then expanded rapidly, causing the universe to begin expanding and cooling down. As the universe continued to expand, matter began to clump together, forming galaxies, stars, and planets.

2. How does the Big Bang relate to the origin of atomic and subatomic motion?

The Big Bang Theory is a crucial component in understanding the origin of atomic and subatomic motion. In the early stages of the universe, only the simplest elements such as hydrogen and helium existed. As the universe expanded and cooled, these elements were able to combine and form more complex atoms. These atoms then began to move and interact with each other, eventually leading to the formation of molecules and the complex motions of particles that we observe today.

3. What evidence supports the Big Bang Theory?

There is a significant amount of evidence that supports the Big Bang Theory. One of the strongest pieces of evidence is the cosmic microwave background radiation, which is a faint glow of light that can be detected from all directions in the universe. This radiation is believed to be leftover from the initial expansion of the universe and is consistent with the predictions made by the Big Bang Theory. Other evidence includes the abundance of light elements in the universe and the observed expansion of the universe.

4. How does the study of atomic and subatomic motion contribute to our understanding of the Big Bang?

The study of atomic and subatomic motion allows scientists to better understand the processes that occurred in the early stages of the universe. By studying the behavior of particles at the atomic and subatomic level, scientists can make predictions about the conditions of the universe in its early stages. This information can then be used to validate or refine the theories about the origin of the universe, such as the Big Bang Theory.

5. What is the significance of the Big Bang Theory in modern science?

The Big Bang Theory is widely regarded as one of the most important theories in modern science. It not only explains the origin of the universe but also provides a framework for understanding the evolution of galaxies, stars, and planets. Furthermore, it has led to many advancements in our understanding of physics, such as the study of atomic and subatomic particles and the development of the theory of relativity. The Big Bang Theory continues to be a crucial area of study for scientists, as it provides insights into the fundamental workings of the universe.

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