1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Support PF! Reminder for those going back to school to buy their text books via PF Here!
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Other Books on the History of Physics and Math

  1. May 25, 2016 #1

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I'm looking for an entertaining book on the history of physics and math. I just want it to read for fun. A book that I really enjoyed (really, really) was Entanglement by Amir Aczel. It highlighted how everyone worked together, how they fought, etc.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2016 #2

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!
     
  4. May 25, 2016 #3

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Ha! Check the search results for that. Google shopping. The 3rd one down. I wonder what's so special?
    Edit*
    Ahh, I see. It's inscribed by Feynman.
     
  5. May 25, 2016 #4
    Mathematics and the Physical World by Morris Kline is an interesting book. Not very technical, only a basic knowledge of HS mathematics is needed.
     
  6. May 25, 2016 #5

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    That actually sounds really neat! Nearly exactly what I was looking for in terms of mathematics. Thanks.
     
  7. May 25, 2016 #6
    J. Stillwell wrote an excellent book in the history of mathematics.
     
  8. May 25, 2016 #7
    Morris Kline's Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times is also an enjoyable read albeit at a higher level.
     
  9. May 26, 2016 #8

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

  10. May 26, 2016 #9

    George Jones

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    "To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science" by Steven Weinberg,

    https://www.amazon.com/Explain-Worl...062346652/ref=mt_hardcover?_encoding=UTF8&me=

    The body of this non-mathematical but scholarly book starts with the the ancient Greeks and ends with Newton. There is also some more modern stuff in "Epilogue: The Grand Reduction" and a little math in "Technical Notes".

    From the Preface:

    "So this book is not solely about how we came to learn various things about the world. This naturally a concern of any history of science. My focus in this book is a little different - it is how we came to learn how to learn about the world."

    We teach our kids a cartoon version of how to do science called the Scientific Method, Hypothesis ,,, Result, so I like

    "Archimedes was smart enough to choose the right postulates, but scientific research is more honestly reported as a tangle of deduction, induction, and guesswork."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  11. May 26, 2016 #10
  12. May 26, 2016 #11

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Thanks for all the suggestions. A lot of these look really cool. The only question is: Where to begin? Lol
     
  13. May 26, 2016 #12

    vanhees71

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    2016 Award

    In your situation the best is to go to a library and browse through books about the topic you are interested in. It's great fun, and you may find a book to read in more detail. At least it's the cheapest way to get started, because if you don't already exactly know what you are interested in, it's a pretty expensive way to just buy books from suggestions of others, which may have much different tastes and needs the you have :-)).
     
  14. May 26, 2016 #13
    Then again, you can never own enough books :wink:
     
  15. May 27, 2016 #14

    BiGyElLoWhAt

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I agree. I have a descent collection, but with all these 10ish dollar books, I gotta catch 'em all.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Books on the History of Physics and Math
Loading...