Calculating Energy Released from Uranium Fission

JIn summary, the mass of 3.33x10^-28kg of uranium can be converted into energy during nuclear fission using Einstein's formula E=mc^2, with the energy being measured in joules (J), m in kg, and c representing the speed of light at 3000000000m/s. The amount of energy released during fission is calculated to be 2.997x10^-11 J.
  • #1
estiy
1
0

Homework Statement




a mass of 3.33x10^-28kg of uranium is converted into energy during nuclear fission (exploding) according to einstien's formula

E=mc^2
where energy is measured in joules (J), m is measured in kg and c = 3000000000m/s is the speed of light

Homework Equations



show that the amount of energy released during fission is 2.997x10^-1 J

The Attempt at a Solution




E = mc^2
= 28kg x (3x10^8ms^-1)^2
= 28kg x (3x10^8ms^-1)x(3x10^8ms^-1)
= 28kg (9x10^16m^2s^-2)
= 28 x (9x10^16)kg m^2s^-2
= 252 x 10^16 J
= 2,520,000,000,000,000

thats my attempt.. i know nothing about this stuff and i was trying to do this for a friend.. I am curious now what others come up with
 
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  • #2
[itex] m = 3.33\times 10^{-28} [/itex]

[itex] c = 3\times 10^8 [/itex]

[itex] E = mc^2[/itex]

[itex] E = (3.33\times 10^{-28})(3\times 10^8)^2 = 2.997\times 10^{-11} [/itex]
 
  • #3


I would like to point out that your calculation is incorrect. The mass given in the problem is 3.33x10^-28kg, not 28kg. Also, the speed of light is 3x10^8m/s, not 3000000000m/s. So the correct calculation would be:

E = (3.33x10^-28kg) x (3x10^8m/s)^2
= 3.33x10^-28kg x (9x10^16m^2/s^2)
= 3.33 x (9x10^-12)kg m^2/s^2
= 2.997x10^-3 J

This is the amount of energy released during fission, which is 2.997x10^-3 J, not 2.997x10^-1 J as stated in the problem. It is important to carefully read and understand the given information in a problem before attempting to solve it.

Additionally, as a scientist, I would like to point out that the equation E=mc^2 is only applicable for mass-energy equivalence in special relativity, and may not accurately represent the energy released during nuclear fission. There are other factors and equations involved in calculating the energy released from nuclear fission, such as the binding energy per nucleon and the mass defect. It is important to have a thorough understanding of the physics and principles behind a problem before attempting to solve it.
 

Related to Calculating Energy Released from Uranium Fission

What is uranium fission?

Uranium fission is a nuclear reaction in which the nucleus of an atom of uranium splits into two smaller nuclei, releasing a large amount of energy in the form of heat and radiation.

How is energy released from uranium fission calculated?

The energy released from uranium fission is calculated using the famous equation E=mc^2, where E is the energy released, m is the mass difference between the reactants and products, and c is the speed of light. This equation was first proposed by Albert Einstein in his theory of relativity.

What factors affect the amount of energy released from uranium fission?

The amount of energy released from uranium fission is affected by several factors such as the type of uranium isotope used, the mass and energy of the resulting fission products, and the efficiency of the fission process. The energy released can also be increased by using nuclear moderators or reflectors.

How is energy from uranium fission used?

The energy released from uranium fission is used to generate electricity in nuclear power plants. This energy can also be used for other purposes such as propulsion in nuclear submarines and spacecraft, and in the production of nuclear weapons.

Is uranium fission a safe source of energy?

Uranium fission can be a safe source of energy when proper safety measures and regulations are in place. However, there are risks associated with nuclear accidents and the disposal of radioactive waste. It is important to carefully manage and monitor the use of uranium fission as an energy source.

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