Calculating the Weighted Average of Two Graphs

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of a weighted formula to calculate the X and Y coordinates of a third graph using data from two existing graphs. The tricky part is that the two graphs have different start and end positions, which complicates the calculations. The suggested formula uses a weighted average of the points from both graphs, but there may be additional factors to consider. Further context is needed to fully understand the problem and provide additional suggestions.
  • #1
i have an excel file containing 2 graphs [R & V], and their x & y coordinates in 4 separate lists [the X coordinates of R, the X coordinates of V, the Y coordinates of R, the Y coordinates of V]

i need to calculate the X & Y coordinates of a 3rd graph through a weighted formula that takes 55% of the R coordinates into account + 45% of the V coordinates into account

the tricky part is that R & V start and end at different X coordinates...
for example R starts at x=0 and ends at x=10
while V starts at x=5 and ends at x=15

can anyone help define a better formula for this?
here is what i have so far:
X = (Xr+Xv)/2
Y = (Yr)*0.55 + (Yv)*0.45
the problem with these equations is they don't take into account the different start and end positions of the two graphs

thank you for any help in advance! best regards!
 
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  • #2
Just to clarify what you are asking, would this be the same type of problem:

Graph A gives high temperature data for Jan 1 thru Jan 20, graph B gives high temperature for Jan 10 through Jan 31. You want a graph for the whole month, weighting the readings differently. Is that similar to what you are wanting to do?
 
  • #3
to clarify:
imagine graph A starting at Jan 1 [point M] and ending at Jan 20 [point N]
imagine graph B starting at Jan 10 [point O] and ending at Jan 31 [point P]

i want to generate a set of points that take on a weighted average of the points from graphs A & B but also starts at point M and ends at point P
 
  • #4
jlkamikaze said:
to clarify:
imagine graph A starting at Jan 1 [point M] and ending at Jan 20 [point N]
imagine graph B starting at Jan 10 [point O] and ending at Jan 31 [point P]

i want to generate a set of points that take on a weighted average of the points from graphs A & B but also starts at point M and ends at point P

Well, you can't calculate the average of two numbers when you don't have two numbers. The only sensible thing to do is to use the values from graph A and B on the intervals where that is all you have, and average the values for the places where you have two readings. Whether that is acceptable I guess depends on what you are doing.
 
  • #5
i get what your saying in only using values for the common interval between both graphs

but I am supposed to somehow use weighted averages to weight the data points as well as the difference between the intervals. fairly complicated ugh

thank you btw!
 
  • #6
jlkamikaze said:
i get what your saying in only using values for the common interval between both graphs

but I am supposed to somehow use weighted averages to weight the data points as well as the difference between the intervals. fairly complicated ugh

thank you btw!

I guess I would need more context about what you are doing to see if I would have any other suggestions. At this point it doesn't make much sense to me.
 

1. How do you calculate the weighted average of two graphs?

To calculate the weighted average of two graphs, you need to first determine the weight or importance of each graph. This can be done by assigning a percentage or decimal value to each graph. Then, multiply each data point in the first graph by its weight and add it to the product of each data point in the second graph multiplied by its weight. Finally, divide this sum by the total weight of both graphs to get the weighted average.

2. Why is calculating the weighted average important?

Calculating the weighted average allows you to take into account the importance or significance of each graph, rather than treating all data points equally. This can provide a more accurate representation of the overall trend or pattern in the data.

3. Can the weighted average of two graphs be greater than the values in either graph?

Yes, it is possible for the weighted average of two graphs to be greater than the values in either graph. This can occur if the weight assigned to one graph is significantly higher than the weight assigned to the other graph, or if there are extreme outliers in one of the graphs.

4. What types of data can be used to calculate the weighted average of two graphs?

The weighted average can be used with any type of numerical data, including continuous data (such as height or weight) and discrete data (such as test scores or ratings). It can also be applied to data from different sources, as long as the units and variables are comparable.

5. Are there any limitations to calculating the weighted average of two graphs?

Like any statistical measure, the weighted average has its limitations. It may not accurately represent the data if the weights assigned to each graph are not reflective of their true importance. Additionally, the weighted average may not be applicable if the data is not normally distributed or if there are significant outliers in the data.

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