Calculation of solubility in water

In summary, the forum members are discussing the solubility of helium gas in water at a pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 25 degrees. One member is wondering if this solubility law can be applied to the entire bulk volume of water, while also questioning if the surface area of exposure or mass transfer theories should be considered. Another member is asking about estimating the degasification rate of solubilized helium from water under different conditions, and if there is a law to calculate this transfer. However, the speed of degasification is a more complex issue that may require further assistance.
  • #1
vinchem14
2
0
Dear Forum members,

Situation: 3000 litre of water is pressurized with 1 bar helium gas in closed tank.

question 1: My question is that, if i know the solubility of helium gas in water at 1 bar partial pressure of helium over water at temp of 25 deg is 0.00145 g/litre, Whether i can apply this solubility law to entire bulk volume of water.

Solubility value for 3000 litre of water = 0.00145*3000 = ?

Whether solubility of helium gas depends upon the surface area of exposure of water or resistance offered by the liquid to transfer the solute from water interface to its bulk volume. or either i should interphase mass transfer theories to calculate the exact amount of soluble gases in 3000 litre of water.


question 2: If we have estimated the solubility in 3000 litres of water, how can we similarly estimate the degasification rate of solublized helium from water, if same water is kept under different conditions of nitrogen gas pressure or in a vacuum condition (after achieving sufficient solubility with helium gas). Is there any law to calculate the amount of solublized gas transfer from water to gas phase.
 
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  • #2
You can assume concentration of helium in the bulk is the one given if the system is left to equilibrate for long enough. With mixing 'long enough' means hours rather then days.

Speed of degasification is a completely different problem, one that is much more difficult to handle. Hopefully someone else will be able to help.
 

Related to Calculation of solubility in water

1. What is solubility?

Solubility refers to the ability of a substance, known as the solute, to dissolve in another substance, known as the solvent. In the context of solubility in water, it specifically refers to the amount of a substance that can dissolve in a given amount of water at a specific temperature and pressure.

2. How is solubility in water calculated?

Solubility in water is typically calculated using the solubility product constant (Ksp). This constant is a measure of the maximum amount of a solute that can dissolve in a particular solvent. It is determined experimentally and varies for different substances.

3. What factors affect solubility in water?

The solubility of a substance in water can be affected by several factors, including temperature, pressure, and the presence of other solutes. Generally, as temperature increases, solubility also increases, but this is not always the case. Pressure can also have an impact on solubility, particularly for gases. The presence of other solutes can affect solubility through a process called "salting out" or "salting in," which involves interactions between the solutes and the solvent.

4. Why is solubility important?

Solubility is important for many reasons. In chemistry, it is a fundamental property that helps determine the behavior of substances in various environments. It is also crucial in industries such as pharmaceuticals, where the solubility of drugs in water can affect their effectiveness and absorption in the body. In environmental science, understanding solubility is important in studying the movement and fate of pollutants in water systems.

5. How can solubility in water be increased?

There are several ways to increase the solubility of a substance in water. One way is to increase the temperature, as most solids and gases have higher solubility in water at higher temperatures. Another way is to change the pressure, as this can affect the solubility of gases. Additionally, using a different solvent or adjusting the pH of the solution can also increase solubility. Finally, certain chemical compounds, called solubilizing agents, can be added to the solution to increase solubility.

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