Can a simply supported beam be a cylinder?

In summary, the conversation is about a cylindrical load cell that is compressed in the middle and has a slight gap between the end supports. The strain gauges measure shear force across two planes. The problem is that the output at 0kg is becoming offset after use, and the person is trying to figure out how much force is being applied to create this offset. They are considering treating the pin as a simply supported beam to start their calculations. The question is asked if a cylindrical pin can be considered as a simply supported beam, and the answer is yes. The person also mentions that the offset on the load cell is too large to be attributed to drift or output change, and they are trying to determine if it is overload, shock, or
  • #1
cps.13
40
1
I have an application where I am trying to figure out the shock load being applied to a metal pin (load cell).

It is a cylindrical load cell which is supported at either end, and compressed in the middle. There is a slight gap between the end supports and the section compressed in the middle, this provides shear force across two planes which is measured by strain gauges.

In our situation we know the output from the strain gauges at 500Kg shear force, but the output at 0kg is becoming offset after use, and I need to try and figure out how much force is being applied to create this offset.

I don't really know where to start, but in my reading so far it seems like if I could treat the pin as a simply supported beam I might be able to make a start. So back to my question, can a cylindrical pin be considered as a simply supported beam?

thanks
 
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  • #2
If your load cell has never been significantly overloaded then I doubt whether you have damaged it .

It is always possible though that your shock load has a short duration spike in it which is causing problems .

Load cell set ups sometimes develop an off set without them being in any way damaged . Normally this offset is just trimmed out .

Answer to your actual question is that a beam can certainly be cylindrical in shape .
 
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  • #3
Nidum said:
If your load cell has never been significantly overloaded then I doubt whether you have damaged it .

Load cell set ups sometimes develop an off set without them being in any way damaged . Normally this offset is just trimmed out .

Answer to your actual question though is that a beam can certainly be cylindrical in shape .

Hi

thanks for the reply - I know that the offset on the load cell is too large to be attributed to drift or output change once in situ. The load cell output is certainly damge of some description, what I am trying to determine is if it is overload, shock or torque that is causing it.

i'll look more into the maths!

thanks
 
  • #4
cps.13 said:
can a cylindrical pin be considered as a simply supported beam
Yes

cps.13 said:
what I am trying to determine is if it is overload, shock or torque that is causing it.
Wouldn't it be better to remove it and directly inspect the part after the damage? With a little magnification you can probably see what the cause is.
 
  • #5
Dale said:
Wouldn't it be better to remove it and directly inspect the part after the damage? With a little magnification you can probably see what the cause is.

How would you see it by magnification?

Thanks
 
  • #6
With a low power microscope or a hand held magnifying lens.
 

1. Can a simply supported beam be a cylinder?

Yes, a simply supported beam can be a cylinder. A simply supported beam refers to a structural element that is supported at two points and can only resist vertical loads. A cylinder can be used as a simply supported beam if it is supported at both ends and can withstand the required load.

2. How does a cylinder behave as a simply supported beam?

A cylinder behaves similarly to other structural shapes, such as rectangular or circular beams, when used as a simply supported beam. It can resist bending and shear forces, as well as support vertical loads.

3. What are the advantages of using a cylinder as a simply supported beam?

One advantage of using a cylinder as a simply supported beam is its ability to support heavy loads without buckling. It also has a high strength-to-weight ratio, making it an efficient choice for structural support.

4. Are there any limitations to using a cylinder as a simply supported beam?

One limitation of using a cylinder as a simply supported beam is its susceptibility to torsion forces. This can be addressed by adding reinforcement, such as steel bars, to increase its resistance to torsion.

5. Can a hollow cylinder be used as a simply supported beam?

Yes, a hollow cylinder can be used as a simply supported beam. The thickness of the cylinder's walls will affect its strength and load-bearing capacity, so it is important to carefully consider the design and material properties when using a hollow cylinder as a simply supported beam.

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