Can Anything Achieve a 'Break-Through' Velocity That No Force Can Slow Down?

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In summary: Can things only possibly move as fast as how much power the forces that act upon them have?Things can only move as fast as the power that the forces that act upon them have. Will things that forces move always be governed by them too?Yes, things that forces move always are governed by them too. Would love to hear some wise insight from the forum.
  • #1
Vectory
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What is the likelihood of anything gaining enough momentum that no other outside forces could ever slow it down any more than this 'break-through' velocity even if they are what accelerated it? Can things only possibly move as fast as how much power the forces that act upon them have? Will things that forces move always be governed by them too? Would love to hear some wise insight from the forum.
 
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Does anybody have any thoughts about this idea? According to thermodynamics the law of conservation of momentum only applies to closed systems in which the amount of particles and their momentum is always constant because matter cannot be exchanged through its 'boundary' into the surroundings and only external forces can change the velocity of the objects in such a system. Can we safely assume then that the solar system is closed because the momentum of the planets and all that revolves around them together around the sun stays the same and neither do they travel further away enough from the center of mass to go outside the systems parameters or 'boundaries' or is some kind of inverted system where it is open and matter can enter it from outside but the matter inside cannot go out of its periphery? But if we think outside of closed systems and open ones like the planet earth, where external forces can act upon things in space (which will either accelerate or decelerate them) such as the whole universe which is isolated because a system with no outside environment certainly cannot interact beyond its boundary physically, then could there be any with so much potential energy that when converted into kinetic something could have so much velocity that even colliding with space matter would not ever slow down its momentum? They say the expanding universe is actually stretching like a rubber band, could this slingshot our world into motion forever despite otherwise influences?
 
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  • #3


This is nonsense. Including your misconception of thermodynamics and the conservation of momentum.
 
  • #4


Vectory said:
What is the likelihood of anything gaining enough momentum that no other outside forces could ever slow it down any more than this 'break-through' velocity even if they are what accelerated it?
This never happens, and the wording of your questions show that you have misconceptions about forces and momentum.
 
  • #5


The concept of a "break-through" velocity is often used in the context of space travel, where it refers to the minimum speed required to escape the gravitational pull of a celestial body. In this case, the likelihood of an object reaching a break-through velocity depends on several factors, including the object's initial velocity, its mass, and the strength of the gravitational pull it is trying to escape. It is important to note that even if an object reaches a break-through velocity, it may still be affected by outside forces such as gravitational pulls from other objects or collisions with particles in space.

In terms of acceleration, an object can only move as fast as the forces acting upon it allow. This is described by Newton's second law of motion, which states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. Therefore, the more powerful the forces acting on an object, the greater its acceleration will be. However, as an object's velocity increases, other factors such as air resistance or friction may come into play and limit its speed.

It is important to recognize that forces do not always dictate an object's motion. In some cases, an object may have a constant velocity even when forces are acting upon it, as long as these forces are balanced. This is known as Newton's first law of motion, which states that an object will remain at rest or in motion with a constant velocity unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

Overall, the concept of break-through velocity and the factors that influence an object's motion are complex and depend on various external factors. As scientists, it is our job to study and understand these concepts in order to gain a deeper understanding of the physical world around us.
 

Related to Can Anything Achieve a 'Break-Through' Velocity That No Force Can Slow Down?

What is 'break-through' velocity?

'Break-through' velocity, also known as breakthrough speed or breakthrough point, is the velocity at which an object or particle begins to move through a medium or barrier. It is the minimum speed required for an object to overcome the resistance or barrier and continue moving forward.

How is 'break-through' velocity calculated?

The calculation of 'break-through' velocity depends on the specific conditions and medium in which the object is moving. In general, it can be calculated by taking into account the properties of the object, such as its mass and surface area, and the properties of the medium, such as its density and viscosity.

What factors affect 'break-through' velocity?

The factors that affect 'break-through' velocity include the properties of the object, such as its mass, shape, and surface area, as well as the properties of the medium, such as its density, viscosity, and surface tension. Other factors, such as temperature and pressure, can also impact 'break-through' velocity.

Why is 'break-through' velocity important?

'Break-through' velocity is important because it determines the ability of an object to move through a medium or barrier. It is a crucial factor in many scientific and engineering applications, such as fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, and filtration processes.

Can 'break-through' velocity be exceeded?

Yes, 'break-through' velocity can be exceeded if the object is subjected to a force greater than the resistance or barrier it is facing. However, this may result in changes to the properties of the object or medium and can lead to different behaviors or outcomes than initially expected.

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