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Can I deduce the coefficient of static friction with Mass, Velocity and Radius?

  1. Sep 28, 2012 #1
    The Known:
    Mass=2000kg
    Velocity=50m/s
    Radius=1000m

    With the given information the lab worksheet I'm working on is asking me to deduce the coefficient of friction so that I can manipulate the data and answer some questions. The problem I have is that I am not entirely sure that this could be done with just the given information. BTW, this is supposed to be a car on a track.

    My attempt at the solution is:

    Using Fs= mv^2/r I can get 2000*50^2/1000=5000N

    so the question I have is can I use this as the following Fs(max) in this equation to figure out the coefficient of static friction?

    Fs(max)=μn where n is the normal force or m*g witch in this case would be 2000*9.8=19,600kgs.

    If were to attempt that is would be Fx(max)/n = μ 5000/19600=.26

    Is my logic sound? Please help.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 28, 2012 #2

    NascentOxygen

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hi Naoki. Would you like to have another go at posting your question. None of the details have appeared in your message.
     
  4. Sep 28, 2012 #3
    could you look again, I just edited it. thanks
     
  5. Sep 28, 2012 #4

    NascentOxygen

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    That looks right, assuming it can go no faster without slipping. :smile:

    http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/5725/red5e5etimes5e5e45e5e25.gif [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  6. Sep 28, 2012 #5
    I dont know if that is the max speed without slipping. I know that it is the Force of friction with the known. Would that change the answer?
     
  7. Sep 28, 2012 #6

    NascentOxygen

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    Staff: Mentor

    Were the car able to go even faster, still without slipping, then your calculations would come up with a greater value for μ for that surface.
     
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