Can I make an electromagnet attract to either pole of a mag?

In summary, this particular electromagnet can be manipulated to attract either pole of a permanent magnet by altering the placement or structure of its poles. This can be achieved by adding an extension piece or removing the outer return cylinder. The alternate images show that the "holding end" of the electromagnet has both poles brought out, with an opposite N/S on the center pole and outer pole. This setup minimizes the magnetic path length through the air for a stronger holding force when attached to a ferrous metal plate.
  • #1
radaballer
86
0
Can an electromagnet like this one be manipulate to attract either pole of a permanent magnet by running the current in either direction?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Metal-11LB-5kg-0-5A-Electric-Lifting-Magnet-Holding-Electromagnet-9V-DC-50N-/161550273936?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item259d258d90
 
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  • #2
radaballer said:
Can an electromagnet like this one be manipulate to attract either pole of a permanent magnet by running the current in either direction?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Metal-11LB-5kg-0-5A-Electric-Lifting-Magnet-Holding-Electromagnet-9V-DC-50N-/161550273936?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item259d258d90

Yep! :smile:
 
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Likes radaballer
  • #3
berkeman said:
Yep! :smile:

Actually, I need to modify my answer...

If you look at the alternate images you will see the "holding end" of the electromagnet. To make the strongest holding force, they bring both poles of the electromagnet out on that end, with a center pole an an outer pole that have opposite N/S on them. That way when you attach it to a ferrous metal plate, the magnetic path length through the air is minimized.

So, if you want to be able to attract a N or S pole with this, you would do best to put an extension piece on the center pole, to get it away from the outer return cylinder. Or you may be able to take it apart and remove the outer return cylinder.

Makes sense?
 
  • #4
berkeman said:
Actually, I need to modify my answer...

If you look at the alternate images you will see the "holding end" of the electromagnet. To make the strongest holding force, they bring both poles of the electromagnet out on that end, with a center pole an an outer pole that have opposite N/S on them. That way when you attach it to a ferrous metal plate, the magnetic path length through the air is minimized.

So, if you want to be able to attract a N or S pole with this, you would do best to put an extension piece on the center pole, to get it away from the outer return cylinder. Or you may be able to take it apart and remove the outer return cylinder.

Makes sense?
Yes, thank you
 
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Related to Can I make an electromagnet attract to either pole of a mag?

1. How do I make an electromagnet attract to either pole of a magnet?

To make an electromagnet attract to either pole of a magnet, you will need a power source, a conducting wire, and a ferromagnetic core. The core can be made of iron, steel, or any other material that can be magnetized. Wrap the conducting wire around the core to create a coil, and connect the ends of the wire to the power source. When the current flows through the wire, it creates a magnetic field that will attract to the poles of a magnet.

2. Can I control the strength of the electromagnet's attraction to a magnet?

Yes, you can control the strength of the electromagnet's attraction to a magnet by adjusting the amount of current flowing through the wire. The more current you have, the stronger the magnetic field will be, and the more force it will exert on the magnet. You can also change the number of coils in the wire or the material of the core to alter the strength of the electromagnet.

3. What is the difference between the north and south poles of a magnet?

The north and south poles of a magnet have opposite magnetic orientations. This means that the north pole of one magnet will be attracted to the south pole of another magnet, while two north poles or two south poles will repel each other. The magnetic field lines also flow from the north pole to the south pole of a magnet.

4. Can I make an electromagnet attract and repel a magnet at the same time?

No, it is not possible to make an electromagnet attract and repel a magnet at the same time. The direction of the magnetic field is determined by the direction of the current flowing through the wire. To change the direction of the magnetic field, you would need to change the direction of the current, which would also change the direction of the force exerted on the magnet.

5. What are some real-world applications of electromagnets?

Electromagnets have various practical applications. They are used in electric motors, generators, speakers, and MRI machines. They are also used in cranes and lifts to lift heavy objects, in doorbells and buzzers to create sound, and in magnetic levitation trains to propel and suspend the train above the track. Electromagnets are also an essential component in many household appliances, such as refrigerators, washing machines, and vacuum cleaners.

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