Can someone please tell me the name of this motor-like device

  • Thread starter carlos468
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  • #1
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Can some please tell me the name of this ?
20171215_113130.jpg

20171215_113141.jpg
this is just the shaft the part above is meant to spin
this came out of a lyman case prep xpress for making gun gun cartridges someone bought it to me it is 120v but they pluged it into 240v and of course burnt it out there is no writing on it and i would like to beable to source a new one to get it fixed or at least try to repair this one if that would be possable

thanks for any help :)
 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Nidum
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Might be a hysteresis motor .
 
  • #3
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That is a shaded-pole induction motor. Direction of rotation is anticlockwise.

It’s a simple coil that could be rewound.
 
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  • #4
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thankyou very much guineafowl :)
 
  • #5
donpacino
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That is a shaded-pole induction motor. Direction of rotation is anticlockwise.

It’s a simple coil that could be rewound.
Can you share how you know that
 
  • #6
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Can you share how you know that
Look at the first picture - you can see the shorted turns at approximately 2 and 8 o’clock around the rotor hole.

Now imagine the coil driving a N pole on the right-hand side. As the N creeps in, it will induce current in the 2 o’clock shorted turn, which will oppose it.

So the N will be crowded into the lower right. As the field ceases to grow, the current in the shorted turn will decrease, allowing the N to centre itself on the right. Then the field decreases, and the shorted turn will produce its own N to oppose the change, and the centre of N will move to top right.

So the action of the shaded (with shorted turns) part of the pole will produce a field that rotates from lower right to top right - anticlockwise.
 
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  • #7
sophiecentaur
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Can you share how you know that
When you are of an 'earlier generation', you remember stuff that no one makes any more. Shaded pole motors were used in pretty well all record player decks, ceiling fans, cheap tape recorder decks and many other applications and they still have their applications. They are very reliable with no brushes and no commutator or slip rings and work off a single phase supply. The shorted turn(s) produce a phase difference in the magnetic field from the stator, which the 'squirrel cage' rotor chases. They had a fairly well controlled speed for keeping records playing at near enough the right pitch and the only disadvantage is that they tend to run a bit warm but no one cared.
It’s a simple coil that could be rewound.
Rewinding that coil is quite possible but you may find it's hard to squeeze the original number of turns on. Neatness and tightness are essential and it would be worth while getting the use of a lathe for filling the bobbin as full as necessary. A hand drill may do if you can get it to go at a low speed and clamp things firmly. Splitting the core may be difficult too as it will probably be potted in some resin. Pretty difficult to do if you try with the coil in situ, though, Count the coils carefully as you remove them. I have never done it myself - but there was no need because you could get hold of the right replacement easily. Probably not so easy nowadays but worth a trawl on eBay. Always worth approaching the manufacturer.
 
  • #9
sophiecentaur
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Oi! I’m 35!
That's totally ancient in some people's eyes. Schoolkids reckon anyone over 25 is over the hill.
No offence though - I beat you by a factor of two. :nb)
 
  • #10
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Have you tried contacting Lyman directly about obtaining a replacement? Found the manual, but (as is all too often the case nowadays) it is thin on details, and refers all such requests to a customer service center (phone: 800-22LYMAN).

The gizmo in the 2nd photo that the motor rotor is connected to appears to be a parallel shaft gearbox. Lyman user manual specs show a tool speed of 125 RPM. It's hard to say whether the motor gearbox is 125 RPM as well, because all five of the tool posts are active at the same time. This opens the possibility of an additional ratio change between the gearmotor proper and tooling posts, or a specially built gearbox with 5 output shafts.

Lyman1.jpg


One angle of attack is to obtain an off-the-shelf motor with an identical stator (as shown in your 1st photo), and swap it with the burned-out one. Challenge is, shaded pole motors have practically no standardization. You might get lucky in contacting a sales engineer at Gems or another shaded pole motor manufacturer who'll say, "Yep, that's one of ours. I really shouldn't be doing this, but here's what you have to buy", but I wouldn't count on it. Equipment manufacturers and motor OEMs often enter into an agreement to prevent direct sales.

I've seen new Lyman case prep units identical to this one on eBay in the $120 to $140 USD range. It may be cheaper to buy a new one versus obtaining a replacement motor or rewinding the failed one.
 

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  • #11
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Thankyou for all the the reply's soon as i was given what it was called and googled what application's it was used for which was alot i had one in the loft in the shape of a desk top fan 240v which is good as the step down box can go back to amazon saving money (which we like) i have fitted it and it works only thing im not sure on is the speed as i never seen this case prep working in the first place the case prep has gears so i take that it probably wont matter to much about the rpm the motor runs at still it works again and that is what its about better then land fill. thanks again
 
  • #12
wirenut
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If you google shaded pole c-frame motor, I believe dayton make some replacements. You'll need to know voltage,shaft diameter, shaft length, rotation, and rpm.
also make sure on mounting dimensions. Or look in second hand shops for an old turntable Also some cheaper exhaust fans from broan/nutone use the, but i don't know the rpm of those.
 
  • #13
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...only thing im not sure on is the speed...
Induction motors run at slightly less rpm than the synchronous speed. This is called slip and it depends on the load. We could guess a 5% to 10% slip for your motor. The synchronous speed depends on the AC frequency and the number of poles in the stator ##n_s=\frac{120f}{p}## rpm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_motor#Synchronous_speed). Your motor has 2 poles and if the frequency is 50Hz then ##n_s=3000## rpm. Discounting the slip assumed above that leaves about 2700 to 2850 rpm.
 
  • #14
jim hardy
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I just went through replacing a 'burnt up' shaded pole motor that looks a lot like yours. It was a Nutone type bathroom exhaust fan motor, as mentioned earlier by Mr wirenut. This was the exact replacement for it:
http://www.acehardware.com/product/...MIkYqxpe-P2AIVTIezCh3AxwwhEAQYASABEgJpsPD_BwE
Splines on the shaft look like yours but i can't tell dimensions....


I unwrapped the tape that covers the windings and found a small fuse soldered in series with the power cord. It had saved the windings as it's designed to do.
So i could have just replaced the fuse with an external inline fuse , but didn't because it's installed in a house and i didn't want to alter the design of an installed appliance for liability reasons.
New motor was only nineteen bucks and super easy to install.

Since yours is a benchtop tool not an installed household fixture i suggest you look under the tape that wraps the winding. If there's a fuse there and the windings are still okay, try to find a replacement fuse.
If you can't find a similar solder-in fuse, there do exist inline fuseholders for small glass fuses..
IMPORTANT::>>>Be sure to use 250 volt rated fuse not an automotive fuse they're only 32 volt.<<<
Current rating must be equal or a little bit less than whatever you find under the tape, not greater.
My daughter's exhaust fan had a 2 amp fuse.

good luck

old jim
 

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